My Fall Reading List – Science, Technology & Teams

This fall I chose a theme of “science and technology” and then realized via this reading list how, once again, teams are so important to anything successful that occurs in life.

Here is what I read and learned about:

No One Cares About Crazy People – by Ron Powers – the author’s family includes two sons with schizophrenia, which provides Powers with a bird’s eye view into our broken mental health system.  In great detail, he interweaves the history and failures of our approach to mental health in parallel with the struggles and bias his own children have faced.  A worthy read and one that you hope becomes outdated soon.

Machine Learning: The New AI – by Ethem Alpaydin – the MIT Press has an excellent series of books describing what’s next in as close to laymen’s terms as you can hope for with otherwise highly technical subjects.  Machine learning (ML) is a discipline that we use every day at W2O Group to power our analytics work. In my view, ML will be mainstream knowledge for every communicator and marketer within five years.  We all tend to think that new technology is just for the geeks, but advances like ML are actually making it easier for all of us to geek out and make a real difference in how we analyze our world.

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End – by Atul Gawande – Dr. Gawande is an exceptional author, who chooses, in this book, to make us think about how we age in U.S. society and how we can improve on a healthcare system unprepared for change.  My biggest takeaway is that we’ll do more for those in the last years of their lives via common sense decisions than we will, in most cases, through medical interventions.  A wake up call on how to think about geriatrics.

Warnings: Finding Cassandras to Stop Catastrophes – by Richard A. Clarke and R.P. Eddy – the authors illustrate how “Cassandras” often tell us what will happen, but we choose to ignore them.  From Katrina to Fukashima, few disasters were surprises.  I found a real parallel here for all of us who innovate.  It is often hard to convince people about how the world may change, since they like to root their decisions in the current environment.  It’s more comfortable.  Until ISIS forms or a city floods or a power grid is shut down.  Exploring why we fail to listen is…..worth a listen…..

Astrophysics for People in a Hurry — by Neil deGrasse Tyson – this is the holiday gift choice in this list by a wide margin.  Neil does such an excellent job of explaining our universe in bite size chunks that we can all understand.  I know more about our moon, supernovas and how the universe is expanding from this book than what I learned from all prior books put together.

Together is Better – by Simon Sinek – you know him as the famous Ted Talk guy who “starts with why”.  Using a similar approach, he talks about the power of teams and how we can all more effectively work together.  I found it particularly resonant as I thought about how important it is for the mental health world to partner more effectively or how the best care occurs when healthcare professionals team up to provide the best care for the aging patient, regardless of their position or how we could all do a better job listening to new ideas to further our goals.

It was an interesting set of books to read.  Now, for the winter, I am planning to focus on individuals who have impacted our history (e.g. Kissinger) and just read some books for fun, many of these books are past recommendations from all of you.  Thank you to Will de Groot for the Being Mortal book and Jim Weiss for Together is Better.

Best, Bob

 

Bob Pearson
Bob Pearson
Vice Chairman & Chief Innovation Officer

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