CommonSense Blog

London PreCommerce Summit: An Interview with Speaker, Simon Shipley of Intel

By Aaron Strout | Sep 09, 2015

As some of you who work with or follow W2O Group know, we as a company place a heavy emphasis on thought leadership. Not only do we create content regularly for this blog, speak at events and deliver client “trend” presentations, but we also host our own events throughout the year. To that end, our London PreCommerce Summit is happening next week on Monday, September 14th (this coincides with London’s Social Media Week). You must be on the registration list if  you are interested in attending so please reach out to me or RSVP online here ahead of time.

To give you a little sneak peek into some of the content at this year’s event, I interviewed client and PreCommerce speaker, Simon Shipley. Simon is also the Marketing and Innovation Manager at Intel. Now onto the questions!

simon_shipley

Simon Shipley, Intel

Aaron: Simon, how has your role evolved at Intel over the last 14 years?
Simon: I started off in a channel sales role where myself and 5 others defined and mapped out our indirect customers who bought from our authorised distributers. We met with over 2500 companies in the first year. After a few other sales roles I moved into a country marketing and then an EMEA marketing role. The role has changed from traditional marketing but has always had a strong digital focus; even back in 2008 we made the decision to spend 65% of global marketing budget spend to digital. Since then, things have just exploded – channels, capabilities, data, metrics, management, you name it. I’ve witnessed not just the arrival of social networks, but their evolution from novelty to curiosity (marketing-wise) to platforms with advanced monetisation models. It is often remarked upon, but with good reason – it’s been a huge shift. Closer to home, we (Intel) have recently been building out our platform for storytelling to have a more direct relationship with our audience. Overall I would say my role alongside those of my colleagues has required us to be more even responsive to change (forget trying to stay ahead of any curves!) and that there is an interesting dynamic with the speed of change that I have spent more time with fellow brands discussing common problems and opportunities

AS: I noticed the role “Innovation” in your title. I know that’s an important word to Intel. How do you “innovate” in your day-to-day job?
SS: Actually I am slightly ambivalent about the word ‘innovation’ in my title but it provides a useful focal point on how we look at change and our ability to do things differently over time. There is a perception that innovation is about big sweeping changes delivered at scale. Whilst these occasionally happen, innovation is more often about small continuous changes and improvement that added together over time amount to something significant. I am a big fan of Dave Brailsford, the Team Principal at Team Sky and the approach he continues to take in elite cycling with the “aggregation of marginal gains” that has led to extraordinary success. In my day-to-day job we continually look to drive improvements no matter how small by pulling out insight, being observant and unafraid to learn from those who I think are doing things better. It’s about staying curious, really, and also being prepared to fail occasionally. I am lucky to work in a company whose culture supports this.

AS: What are three changes you see happening in the consumer tech space over the next 3-5 years?SS: There will be so much change and three to five years is a very long time in technology space.

  1. Intelligence is coming to devices that will make them contextually aware of us and their surroundings. This has profound implications for what our tech will be able to for us, how we interact with it, and – importantly – how we feel about it and react to that.
  2. Wireless charging – unless there is a big breakthrough in battery life I see wireless charging of devices will become the norm. In fact, irrespective of this, I think it will become the norm. The impact of this could be massive as we have the potential to be even more mobile, both within the workplace as well as being out and about.
  3. The power of big data will have an impact on individuals in areas like personalised healthcare that could revolutionise treatments for conditions such as Alzheimer’s and Cancer based on genomic analysis by handling and ordering massive sets of data to develop treatment that can be matched to an individual need.
    There are also all the factors of data privacy whether government legislation or consumer expectations.

AS: You are speaking at our upcoming PreCommerce Summit – what topic do you plan on speaking about?
SS: I will be talking about the strategic imperative for companies (or brands) to own their own data: the sheer amount of options on the market with regard to data automation is staggering, and while each of them maybe a potential solution, there are arguably too many solutions to be able to know which ones best meet a marketer’s needs. This in turn creates process challenges, and it is our job as marketers to maintain a clarity of focus on what we are, in the end, trying to achieve. This will in some cases require changes to our skill set.

AS: What is the last book you read (business or pleasure). Describe it in 2-3 sentences. And most importantly, would you recommend it?
SS: That’s an easy one. I have just finished reading Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban to my children. I think it is the moment in the series of the books where things get much more interesting, with the characters and plots both acquiring more depth. Would I recommend it? Absolutely!

And there you have it. Thank you Simon for taking the time out of your busy day to answer these questions. We’ll see you next Monday at the Summit!