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On this week’s episode, Jim Weiss, W2O Group Founder & CEO, highlights the grit of cancer survivors and researchers, opens up about his personal and family journey fighting cancer, and some of the exciting therapies emerging to help make a difference for patients.

Jim has been in the health care industry for several decades. “This is an exciting time in cancer research and medicine,” he said, “probably like no other, and I really think coming out of this meeting we’ll really see some breakthrough science and medicine.”

Over the weekend, W2Ogo will be sitting down with some of the leaders in the field to talk about innovation on the front lines of the fight against cancer.

Check out my conversation with Jim below and stay tuned for more.

The use of social media in health has always had one big question lingering over it: why? In a world so focused on real-world interactions that the fax machine – an apparatus that literally gives physical form to the digital world – what is the value-add of a technology that swaps face-to-face interaction for something more ethereal.

That’s the thread that spurred our Social Oncology Project, now in its sixth year. In that span, we’ve looked at everything from the topics that make up the global oncology conversation to narrower examinations of hashtag communities and the way that they bring patients, caregivers and providers together.

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But still the questions arise: why? Why should hospitals invest in social media, and why should physicians – in an era where provider burnout is a real and growing danger to the profession – add one more task to their daily routines?

This year, we set to answer some of those questions, seeking to excavate correlations between top-ranked oncology hospitals – as defined by U.S. News and World Report – and the online behavior of those institutions and their physicians.

Among other conclusions, we found a strong positive correlation between the percentage of a hospitals doctors who are on Twitter and the physician reputation score from U.S. News and World Report.

The top 26 hospital facilities in the USNWR rankings all can boast that over 20 percent of their oncology-related specialists are on Twitter, with some especially forward-looking institutions – the Mayo Clinic, the Mayo Clinic-Phoenix and the Cleveland Clinic – all boasting Twitter usage rates of more than 40 percent of oncology specialists. And those that saw the fastest growth in social media use also saw the most rapid gains in reputation.

In addition to looking at the way that online behavior of providers and institutions intersected with real-world metrics, we also did a second analysis looking more broadly at conversations about oncology medications and value over the course of 2017. This has been a year of extraordinary dialogue on drug prices – President Donald Trump made headlines on the topic, again, this week – and we wanted to see where oncology drugs fell in the conversation.

The topline conclusion: doctors and media were much more likely to discuss the price of oncology medicines than the general population, but – as a share of the overall conversation around a given product – pricing tended not to dominate the conversation around any specific oncology product.

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Last week UK academics and representatives from the NHS and a couple of young people gathered at the House of Commons to take part in a panel run by GlobalNet21 on how we should approach meeting the healthcare needs of Generation Z. More meetup than formal consultation, I quite welcomed the unexpectedly random circumstances that gave the evening a more informal feel then you would expect: the Sri Lankan concurrent event which meant we spent ages in a very busy security queue outside, the change of room, the constant division bells for MP participation and the lack of attendance of perhaps the star of the show, the MP Lisa Cameron (SNP), herself.

None of that mattered much in the end because I was able to catch enough of the opener, the setting-the-scene Q&A between Dr. Sarah Lewis, Research Associate on the Digital Health Generation project, and two young people, Jack and Alex, and heard what they had to say about how Generation Z finds and uses healthcare information. The most important point they highlighted was the difficulty in finding information that they can trust. It was clear they feel they are navigating through all sorts of unfiltered information and it isn’t easy to find credible experiences as sites/apps aren’t advertised adequately. They noted the danger of winding up in bubbles of misinformation but seemed aware of this and clearly had started to craft strategies to mitigate its risk. To form fairly confident decisions, they reported having to constantly check with other sources in order to root out healthcare’s equivalent of fake news. In particular, they called out finding the experiences of others on YouTube as a key place to find information in a way that is not only trustworthy but engaging.

This was perhaps the most important point for me in the session and Hazel Jones, Director of Apps, Wearables and Uptake, NHS Digital, picked up on it and said that she agreed they needed to do more to reach young people through vloggers and were testing concepts using ambassadors. For me, this was the gold nugget I would take away from the event. In my own work researching perceptions around the patient journey, from symptoms, through diagnosis and then onto experiences on treatment I am often staggered by the hugely personal stories shared online by patients themselves and the way online relationships make all the difference to the quality of their lives. As an example, survivors in breast cancer tell others not to Google, not because they don’t want them to find information for themselves, but because oncology data moves so fast, what they are likely to find is already out-of-date and can even cause panic. Here, more than ever, this role of peer-advisor approach is critical. It is on the level of life and death itself, it’s that important.

Unfortunately, the subsequent conversation was directed mostly at healthcare apps. This was a shame as I didn’t see much evidence that Jack and Alex found them particularly valuable. The room was full of people who wanted to mention the buzzwords of big data and IoT and so we got carried off on a discussion on what sounded like what young people clearly want is to be able to track their data, huge amounts of it, and probably all the time. Dr. Emma Rich, Reader/Associate Professor in the Department for Health at the University of Bath tried to reel this in by saying this probably isn’t the future we should be imagining. There are mental health issues that can arise with an overzealous tracking of personal minutiae that we are best to avoid.

Emerging technologies clearly have a key role to play in this but we just need to find better ways to help people find each other to share experiences, and perhaps this is especially true for Generation Z. In this event we only briefly touched on some of what I think are the most important issues. Continuity of care was noted by Professor Andy Miah, PhD, Chair in Science Communications & Future Media, University of Salford and this is of critical importance in accessing services when you live a mobile life, for example, say at university for half the year. You could add digital literacy to that list as well as the emerging consent literacy which we all could use help with.

From my perspective, certainly in our own work at W2O with patients and clinicians, the gaps we see most are not in the technology or the capturing of the data. Where most work needs to be done is around what do the new signals we see in healthcare data actually mean? A cardiologist told me recently that he only wanted to know about a new diagnostic biomarker if it leads to a clinical decision. Whilst it might be interesting from a scientific perspective, it ultimately was just not very useful. Without a sense of what fundamental healthcare behaviours we need to encourage and without the medical evidence to really understand what data points support these over time, we won’t be able to make all this fascinating new data ‘work’ for any of us.

Have you ever had to have a difficult conversation with your agency? Or needed to let a client know they were running significantly over budget? Maybe you’ve wondered why your client is emailing you at all hours of the night and weekend? Or worse, you need to tell your agency that it’s not you, it’s …

Have you ever had to have a difficult conversation with your agency? Or needed to let a client know they were running significantly over budget? Maybe you’ve wondered why your client is emailing you at all hours of the night and weekend? Or worse, you need to tell your agency that it’s not you, it’s them?

Last week, at the National Summit on Strategic Communications, I had the pleasure of sitting down with fellow speaker, friend and client, Amy Atwood, Head of Vaccine Communications at Takeda, to answer some of these tough questions. During this conversation, Amy and I also talked about other ingredients (like “thank you’s”) that go into a successful client and agency relationship.

The idea for this topic came up several months earlier when Amy suggested it as an abstract for an upcoming conference. While we still plan to host this talk later this year, we wanted to share some of these pearls of wisdom with our fellow agency and brand-side colleagues with the hope of shedding some light on this sometimes-complicated relationship.

While we highly encourage you to listen to the interview as we explore the nuances of these best practices, we know that there are some of you that would prefer to cut to the chase. For your benefit, here are the 6 suggestions that Amy shares during our conversation:

  • Treat your agency partners like they are a part of your team
  • Set clear ground rules
  • When it comes to budget conversations, have them early and make it a strategic discussion
  • Listen and brainstorm with your agency, utilize their expertise
  • Immediately address concerns when they arise
  • Always say thank you, remember that everyone is a person

For those that do take the time to listen in, don’t miss the one thing people don’t know about Amy, her book recommendations and of course, what he album choice would be were she to be stranded on a deserted island!

Enjoy!

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Don’t miss an episode! Subscribe to our podcast! The public perception of science has shifted over time – what once inspired, now has the capacity to instill distrust. It’s imperative that we reclaim the narrative back to the heart of what science can be: hopeful and human. Seema Kumar, Vice President, Innovation, Global Health, and Policy Communication at …

Don’t miss an episode! Subscribe to our podcast!

The public perception of science has shifted over time – what once inspired, now has the capacity to instill distrust. It’s imperative that we reclaim the narrative back to the heart of what science can be: hopeful and human. Seema Kumar, Vice President, Innovation, Global Health, and Policy Communication at Johnson & Johnson Innovation, dives into this deeper on this week’s episode.

A quick side note, this week’s episode will feature a guest host, Greg Matthews, Managing Director, Healthcare Analytics Innovation at W2O. Greg has an incredible wealth of knowledge in the health innovation space, he’s a fantastic colleague, and I’m proud to call him a friend (even if he is a Cubs fan). I think you’ll enjoy hearing from him as much as I did.

During #W2OSXSW Seema spoke on our panel, “Breakthrough Innovators Who are Changing the World,” where modern day innovators in the areas of autonomous travel, food recovery, and healthcare, dove into the machine behind innovation. It was a well-attended, fascinating panel, and we knew wanted to pick Seema’s brain a bit more. During their chat, Seema and Greg discuss how we can shift the story of science back to one of awe and hope, A Brief History of Time, and the King of Pop. Take a listen below.


If you’re interested in knowing more about what we do at SXSW, check out our recap page. If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About page. Don’t miss an episode of What2Know, subscribe to our podcast!

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As a part of our commitment to supporting and connecting women in the healthcare industry, W2O became a corporate member of the Healthcare Businesswomen’s Association (HBA).  One of HBA’s initiatives is to honor rising stars each year and I am thrilled to share the news that Mary James, Senior Analytics Director, is being recognized this year as the …

As a part of our commitment to supporting and connecting women in the healthcare industry, W2O became a corporate member of the Healthcare Businesswomen’s Association (HBA).  One of HBA’s initiatives is to honor rising stars each year and I am thrilled to share the news that Mary James, Senior Analytics Director, is being recognized this year as the W2O HBA Healthcare Rising Star.

Learn more about Mary James in write up on PharmaVoice.

W2O Group, Mary James, HBAMary is one of all of the tremendous women here at W2O.  She has been pivotal to running and growing Marketeching and played a leading role in integrating analytics across a wide range of clients and offerings supporting our broader W2O capabilities with a true dedication and passion for the healthcare space.  In her many contributions to W2O, she has created and led analytics teams that have become indispensable to the cross-functional teams they work with. In all of this, she has exemplified a collegial attitude and approached everything as part of a team all coming together for one common W2O goal. Not only have her work and leadership at Marketeching and more broadly across W2O been stellar, but her background at CMS is both impressive and also a great example of how our leaders come from a variety of backgrounds and expertise to create our unique talent base.

It is incredible how many talented and exceptional colleagues we get to work with each day, and we look forward to recognizing and celebrating others in years to come.

Please join me in congratulating Mary on this honor!

You can view all the 2018 HBA Rising stars here.


If you’re interested in knowing more about W2O, check out our Healthcare or About pages.
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We’re proud to be named among the top 40 UK agencies by PRWeek UK! Today it was announced our President of EMEA, Annalise Coady, is being featured in PRWeekUK’s, UK Power Book! I’ve had the pleasure of being her colleague for years and I cannot think of a more deserving recipient. She is an incredible leader, …

We’re proud to be named among the top 40 UK agencies by PRWeek UK!

Today it was announced our President of EMEA, Annalise Coady, is being featured in PRWeekUK’s, UK Power Book! I’ve had the pleasure of being her colleague for years and I cannot think of a more deserving recipient. She is an incredible leader, well-versed in our industry, and brings a client-centric approach to every aspect of her work.

I was able to hop on the phone with Annalise to pick her brain about the current landscape of the marketing and communications’ industry, what makes our firm unique, and her personal goals for our European efforts this year. Take a listen below.

 

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One of the most common questions we get from clients heading into HIMSS is: What’s trending? After all, booths, badges and general bacchanalia at the world’s largest healthcare technology conference don’t come cheap. It helps to know what topics, issues, executives, media, speakers, influencers and brands are trending up…down…or in between. Smart marketers and communicators …

One of the most common questions we get from clients heading into HIMSS is: What’s trending? After all, booths, badges and general bacchanalia at the world’s largest healthcare technology conference don’t come cheap. It helps to know what topics, issues, executives, media, speakers, influencers and brands are trending up…down…or in between. Smart marketers and communicators and their CEOs invest in these insights to inform their message, cut through the clutter and make stronger connections.

So, on the eve of HIMSS18, me and my fellow army of digital health nerds at W2O Group thought it would be worthwhile to share some such insights. HIMSS itself does provide a bit of a petri dish to understand how market conversations are trending.

Like kids in a candy store, the W2O Group analytics team dug into the data, comparing social discussions in the weeks and months before HIMSS18 versus HIMSS17. [i]  More specifically, they viewed public data through the lens of the MDigitalLife Health Ecosystem, which maps online behavior and digital footprints of more than 870,000 stakeholders worldwide, including doctors, patients, industry CXOs, hospitals, payers, technology vendors, advocacy organizations, media, analysts and among many others). For this particular analysis, we analyzed tweets mentioning HIMSS from verified authors in the Health Ecosystem.

Below are five takeaways from W2O’s pre-HIMSS18 social conversation analysis:  

1. The unofficial HIMSS prom court: If HIMSS had a prom court, Rasu Shrestha (@RasuShrestha) and Geeta Nayer, MD, (@gnayar) would be dubbed King and Queen, with Janae Sharp (@CoherenceMed), Danielle Siarri (@innonurse), Nick van Terheyden, MD (@drnic1), Charles Webster, MD (@WareFLO), Linda Stotsky (@EMRAnswers), Colin Hung (@Colin_Hung) and Max Stroud (@MMaxwellStroud) rounding out the group. The qualifier for this particular court is most mentioned handles within the HIMSS conversation from January 2017 to February 2018.

2. Social communities are thriving: Social groups and Twitter-based movements are a staple within the broader HIMSS conversation and engagement landscape. For example, #hcldr, which represents the weekly healthcare leader tweet chat/community, #HITsm, which is related to the healthcare IT social media gang and weekly tweet chat, and #pinksocks, which stands for the “PinkSocks Tribe” (whose members you’ll see wearing said color socks with curious mustaches on them at conferences) are all among the top hashtags in the HIMSS conversation both pre-HIMSS 2017 and 2018.

3. Conversation topics on the rise:

  • Precision medicine: From advances in genomics to the necessity that is taking a patient-centric approach to care delivery, use of “precision medicine” increased nearly 200% pre-HIMSS18 versus HIMSS17.
  • Patient centric: Both “patient centered” and “patient outcome” were used 55% and 48% more, respectively, in the weeks leading up to HIMSS18 versus HIMSS17. With HIMSS providing scholarships for patients and advocates at this year’s event (YES), and groups like the Society for Participatory Medicine playing a role, it’s great to see that the social conversation are increasingly mapping back to the patient.
  • Workflow technology: Someone tell @WareFLO that HIMSS-focused discussions mentioning “workflow tech” increased 90% leading up to HIMSS18—though perhaps not surprising, given the renewed industry focus on finding ways to alleviate the administrative burden and burnout on clinicians through better designed systems and solutions.
  • The artificial era: The AI revolution is very much alive and well. Conversations related to AI and machine learning were on the rise in the weeks before HIMSS18, with AI-related conversations increasing 19% pre-HIMSS18 compared to last year.
  • Analytics: None of the above are possible today without accounting for the role that data analytics plays. HIMSS-focused conversations referencing “data analytics” were up 20% leading up to HIMSS18 versus HIMSS17.

4. Notable hashtags support rising trends:

  • Reinforcing the patient-centered takeaways above, it’s great to see #patientengagement used 84% more this year in comparison to pre-HIMSS17.
  • #AI and its variants also increased in use prior to this year’s event as opposed to last, with many sessions in the HIMSS18 agenda focused on case studies of success and lessons learned from AI innovations in action. Related, #radiology is becoming a bigger part of the pre-HIMSS conversation, used 150% more compared to last year pre-event.
  • #VR, #AR and #IoT are even trendier this year, increasing in use upwards of 100-200% pre-HIMSS18 versus pre-HIMSS17.
  • #Aim2Innovate, #TransformHIT, #RethinkRCM, #EmpowerHIT and #Nurses4HIT all picked up steam this year leading in to the event in comparison to social chatter pre-HIMSS17.

5. What comes up…

As telling as it is to see what topics are trending up, those trending down can help tell a different story:

  • Policy-focused staples such as “MACRA” and “ACA” died down in use pre-HIMSS18 in comparison to the post-election year prior
  • Perhaps a bit more surprising, “healthcare costs” were mentioned 92% less leading up to HIMSS18 versus HIMSS17
  • While AI is heavily represented in the pre-event social conversations this year, blockchain in healthcare was mentioned 93% less pre-HIMSS18
  • Mobile apps are also not as popular in the pre-event chatter this year, mentioned 95% less ahead of HIMSS18
  • The patient-first narrative is seeming to take hold, with consumer health and customer experience being discussed 95% and 96% less, respectively, before this year’s event versus 2017.

Lastly, when looking at the audience breakdown of those driving the conversation (below), stakeholders that fall within in the health industry segment of the MDigitalLife Health Ecosystem—e.g., health system CXOs and technology decision makers—are the main conversation contributors, responsible for 40% of the HIMSS related posts, but only making up 27% of the authors.

U.S. Physicians are the opposite, contributing just 6% of posts but making up 23% of the authors. The takeaway? While doctors are present and accounted for, the health industry rules the HIMSS social discussion, contributing nearly seven times more than their caregiver counterparts.

What will the post-HIMSS18 story be? Stay tuned and we’ll tell you!


[i] Comparing conversation leading up to HIMSS 2017 (1.1.17 – 2.15.17) to conversation leading up to HIMSS 2018 (1.1.18 – 2.15.18)


 This blog was co-authored by Steven Cutbirth, Product Commercialization Lead, Healthcare Analytics Innovation at W2O 

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The future of healthcare is being shaped by technology and SXSW Interactive is a great opportunity to learn about what’s coming next. With more than 100 events in this year’s health track, we wanted to highlight the panels we think are the most interesting. Plus, this year W2O has officially joined forces with SXSW and …

The future of healthcare is being shaped by technology and SXSW Interactive is a great opportunity to learn about what’s coming next. With more than 100 events in this year’s health track, we wanted to highlight the panels we think are the most interesting. Plus, this year W2O has officially joined forces with SXSW and are presenting three days of content in the Brand and Marketing track. Naturally, as part of that we’re highlighting healthcare and we’ve included these three panels.

I recommend taking advantage of the networking and meet up events as well. At SXSW introducing yourself to someone new and asking what they have learned so far can lead to a fascinating conversation. Also, be sure to also venture outside the health sphere for inspiration and ideas.

We hope to see you there!

(Please note event summaries are provided by SXSW.com and, in full disclosure, some of the speakers represent companies that are clients across the W2O network of operating companies.)

March 9, 2018

Improve Consumer Experience with Data & Analytics

3:30-4:30pm

Austin Convention Center | Room 6AB

Speaker: Lisa Smith, Chief Consumer Experience Officer, Optum

Consumer experiences in health care are fragmented in a health system that has become increasingly complex. This complexity makes it too easy to get overwhelmed and frustrated, and that leads to disengagement. This is literally bad for one’s health. Consumers need a simple, seamless and smart health care experience. This session will provide actionable best practices on how data and analytics are used to predict consumer next actions and design customized consumer communication campaigns. 

March 10, 2018

How Our Astronauts Make Us Healthy

9:30-10:30am

Austin Convention Center | Room 6AB

Speakers:

The healthcare issues that NASA has to solve to provide safe travel for humans into deep space have a practical application here on Earth. A space ship travelling to Mars or small communities across the globe are both very remote and have limited resources. Medical technologies must be portable, minimally invasive, and easy to use (even by engineer astronauts!). Devices must be robust and require only low power and minimal consumables. Meds need to be very stable and safe for a long time.

Empowering People to Own Their Health Data

9:30-10:30am

Austin Convention Center | Room 9AB

Speakers:

With miniaturized sensors, machine learning, and exponential compute power, researchers can seamlessly capture and understand health information in new ways. What’s next? Figuring out how to share information with those it matters to most: people. This panel will examine how modern initiatives like Project Baseline and All of Us are developing tools and strategies to bridge the gap between clinical research and clinical care, and empower everyday people to understand and manage their health.

Put Down the Scalpel: Non-Invasive Heart Solutions

11:00am-12:00pm

Austin Convention Center | Room 6AB

Speakers:

New school medical diagnostics and interventions aim to reduce unnecessary procedures. This reduction makes the remaining procedures far less invasive while ensuring that hard to detect conditions get treatment earlier. The healthcare system needs innovators to make money by lowering costs overall, putting the pressure on traditional inefficient approaches and making space for innovators to shine.

Connect to End Cancer, Session 1

12:30-1:30pm

Austin Convention Center | Room 6AB

Speakers:

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the AT&T Connected Health Foundry, Merck & Co., Inc., and the Biden Cancer Initiative will host the second annual Connect to End Cancer. Panelists will share their vision for the future of cancer care, driven by an ideal patient experience. From caring for the mental, financial, and emotional well-being of patients to re-designing hospitals, panelists will explore how creating the experience of the future helps cancer patients focus on healing. 

Connect to End Cancer, Session 2

2:00-3:00pm

Austin Convention Center | Room 6AB

Speakers:

Data. Everyone is talking about it. Everyone is collecting it. But how is everyone using it? This forward-looking expert panel will explore the role of genomic data in transforming the cancer care model of the future and take a deeper look at how advances in research and technology can continue to enable the health care industry to deliver products and services that democratize access and provide insights that enhance early diagnosis, clinical care, clinical research and the patient experience.

Connect to End Cancer, Session 3

3:30-4:30pm

Austin Convention Center | Room 6AB

Speakers:

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the AT&T Connected Health Foundry, Merck & Co., Inc., and the Biden Cancer Initiative will host the second annual Connect to End Cancer event. Panelists will discuss the importance of effectively connecting patients and providers to resources that help navigate the treatment process. Additionally, attendees will hear from startups and learn about the role that startups play in improving cancer care.

Here’s My Genome. Call Me Maybe?

5:00-6:00pm

Austin Convention Center | Room 6AB

Speakers:

As healthcare becomes more and more personalized and predictive, technology is taking a more predominant role in the patient perspective, and with that comes massive amounts of new data about people and their experiences. What novel approaches are tech and healthcare companies taking together to create a personalized healthcare experience as a result of this uprising convergence.

March 11, 2018

Do Online Communities Make Us Healthier?

11:00am-12:00pm

Austin Convention Center | Room 8ABC

Speakers:

More than ever, people with health conditions are seeking out peers online who share their condition, speak to their experience, and can answer their questions. As online health communities grow, they are providing answers and insight that go beyond medical care and treatments. The relationships and connections that spring from online health communities contribute to health and well-being in ways not found elsewhere.

Genomes: Let’s Make Rare Disease Rare

12:30-1:30pm

Austin Convention Center | Room 8ABC

Speaker: Howard Jacob, Founder & Director, Envision Genomics

Howard Jacob is Founder, President & Chief Scientific Officer of Envision Genomics. Envision Genomics is based on its Founders’ 7 years of experience delivering genomic medicine tools to patients. Four of those seven years were spent at the Medical College of Wisconsin, during which time Dr. Jacob and the Envision Genomics Founder team were the first to use genomic sequencing to save a patient’s (Nic Volker) life. Now, as an associate company of the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, Envision Genomics’ goal is to enable hospitals and healthcare systems to practice genomic medicine immediately by leveraging the know-how of the Founders, a best-in-class genomic informatics platform and the leading-edge technology infrastructure of HudsonAlpha. Dr. Jacob’s passion for improving the lives of critically ill patients with rare/undiagnosed disease has been the catalyst for his determination to bring whole genome sequencing into the clinical setting to positively impact patient care.

Using Bots to Enhance Clinical Workflow

2:00-3:00pm

Austin Convention Center | Room 6AB

Speaker: Julian Morelli, Senior Program Manager of Microsoft Teams, Microsoft

Communication is at the center of all clinician workflows. In this demo-rich session we will look at how to build communications flows that bring clinicians, conversations and apps together in one place to produce better outcomes. We’ll also discuss intelligent communications capabilities including a demonstration of bot capabilities within a real-world clinical setting using Microsoft Teams.

March 12, 2018

Sequence Me (Again)! Living a Step Ahead of Cancer

12:30-1:30pm

Austin Convention Center | Room 8ABC

Speaker: Byrce Olson, Global Mktg Director of Health & Life Sciences, Intel Health and Life Sciences

In 2014 Bryce Olson, an Intel executive, was diagnosed with stage IV cancer. He should not be alive today based on his prognosis. But he fought cancer differently. He used DNA sequencing data to break into a perfect-fit drug trial, engineering an ‘exceptional response’ and shutting down his cancer for 2 years. In 2017 his cancer came back. As a pioneer in an era of ‘Precision Medicine 2.0’, Bryce works side by side with the scientific, medical, and technology industry to keep him alive.

March 13, 2018

Hacking Childhood Cancer: Creating Support Systems

9:30-10:30am

Austin Convention Center | Room 9AB

Speakers:

How do we “hack” childhood cancer? The disease can have a devastating impact on everyone it touches, and it comprises so much more than treatment and care. When it comes to those of us who have had the briefest opportunities at life, inventiveness is critical to address everyday challenges. From tablet games to shared music playlists, this panel will explore and ignite conversations around creatively improving the childhood cancer experience through the arts, technology and their intersection.

Disrupting Drug Development through Crowdsourcing

11:00am-12:00pm

Austin Convention Center | Room 8ABC

Speakers:

Patients are consumers and today’s consumers are highly self-directed, research driven and actively use social media to navigate and chronicle their personal healthcare and treatment journeys. These global, detailed and candid exchanges create a brand-new data source that can be used to support multi-phases of drug development. Access to insights and the strategic use of social media can reduce drug development timelines, costs and accelerate access to new treatment options.

W2O Presented Panels

March 14, 2018

An Insider’s View into Healthcare Innovation

11:00am-12:00pm

The Fairmont | Congressional Ballroom C

Speakers:

Our world is experiencing the most rapid evolution in care ever experienced. Whether it is the sequencing of our genome or new ways to combat dengue fever or how to improve the efficiency, delivery and cost of healthcare in your hometown, big change is occurring. In this panel, three of the world’s experts will explore what’s next and why it matters to each of us.

March 15, 2018

Breakthrough Innovators Who Changed the World

2:00-3:00pm

The Fairmont | Congressional Ballroom C

Speakers:

From historical figures such as Marie Curie to contemporaries like Steve Jobs, a handful of innovators have changed the world. What made them so spectacularly inventive? Melissa A. Schilling, one of the world’s leading experts on innovation, looks at the lives of seven creative geniuses, plus we’ll hear from other modern day innovators in the areas of autonomous travel and food recovery and healthcare.

Engaging Society via Life-Changing Innovation

3:30-4:30pm

The Fairmont | Congressional Ballroom C

Speakers:

Imagine a world in which consumers are as excited about the newest gene therapy discovery as they are about the iPhone X announcement. Healthcare companies have been at the forefront of many of the most amazing and life-changing discoveries – but society at large is disengaged and even skeptical. How can life sciences companies – from biotech to pharma to manufacturers – shift the way they are representing themselves to cultivate genuine interest in and passion for scientific development? In what ways can they tap in to the marketing and storytelling strategies of tech and consumer companies to capture the minds and hearts of general society? How are they rewriting the rules of the healthcare culture to attract and retain the new wave of innovators who will become ambassadors for science?

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