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As I mentioned in my kickoff post, we will host a series of blog interviews over the next two weeks with speakers from our upcoming PreCommerce Summit (March 10) and Movers & Shapers Summit (March 12). Today’s interview is with long time enterprise technologist and now founder, President and Principal Analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy, Patrick Moorhead. Patrick will be doing a TED-like talk at our Movers & Shapers event on Saturday. His session is will be late morning.a - PatrickMoorhead

According to Patrick’s LinkedIn profile, prior to starting his current firm he “he spent over 20 years as a high-tech strategy, product and marketing executive who has addressed the personal computer, mobility, graphics, and server ecosystems. Unlike other service firms, Moorhead  held executive positions leading strategy, marketing, and product groups. He is grounded in reality as he has led the planning and execution and had to live with the outcomes.” Some of the skills he’s been endorsed for by his peers are product marketing, strategic partnerships and competitive analysis.

Without further ado, let’s jump right into our six questions:

  1. Aaron: How do you define innovation?
    Patrick: Innovation is the process whereby you predict your customers needs before they do, build that widget and service, leapfrog your competition, and create new markets.
  2. Aaron: What are you or your organization doing to drive innovation?
    Patrick: I have initiated a process by which we will make four major changes to the company, every two years. This isn’t Moore’s Law, it’s Moorhead’s Law.
  3. Aaron: Who is someone in your industry (or outside) that you admire? Why?
    I admire Elon Musk because he is such an innovator and a maverick doing it.
  4. Patrick: Where do you see your industry being in 3 years? 5? 10?
    The industry analyst industry will look dramatically different as it will use more real-time methods to acquire important data and will influence using modern marketing channels.
  5. Aaron: What book are you reading right now? How did you choose it?
    Patrick: I don’t read too many books, but I am reading Brainstorm, to better understand my teenage son.
  6. For fun: what three things would you make sure you brought with you in a zombie apocalypse?
    – Hummer with Gatling gun
    – Water purification tablets
    – Waterproof matches

As I mentioned in my kickoff post, we will host a series of blog interviews over the next two weeks with speakers from our upcoming PreCommerce Summit (March 10) and Movers & Shapers Summit (March 12). Today’s interview is with Lord Peter Chadlington, former CEO of Huntsworth and founder/former Chairman of Shandwick Int. Peter will sit down with our own, Bob Pearson, at the PreCommerce Summit on Thursday, March 10 for a fireside chat focused on global digital trends in EMEA.a - Peter Chadlington

According to Peter’s LinkedIn profile, he has spent his “entire working life in communications, as a journalist after graduating from Cambridge University and later in Public Relations both in-house and consultancy. [He] founded Shandwick in 1974, which [he] then developed into the largest PR consultancy in the UK, holding that position for 17 years. [He] built the firm overseas and sold it to The Interpublic Group of Companies in 1998, forming the group that became the largest PR consultancy in the world. ” Some of the skills he’s been endorsed for by his peers are public relations and business strategy.

Without further ado, let’s jump right into our six questions:

  1. Aaron: How do you define innovation?
    Peter: An improved or new solution that adds value – it could be totally new idea, a marginal improvement, or something more radical that disrupts a market.
  2. Aaron: What are you or your organization doing to drive innovation?
    Peter: Leaders can influence by setting the tone for how risk taking will be tolerated …and as importantly, how failure will be managed.
  3. Aaron: Who is someone in your industry (or outside) that you admire? Why?
    Peter: Baroness Martha Lane Fox. She epitomizes my motto ‘never give up’! She is a successful entrepreneur, charity campaigner …and a wonderful person!
  4. Aaron: Where do you see your industry being in 3 years? 5? 10?
    Peter: The boundaries between the traditional marketing elements will continue to blur and at the same time there will be increasing specialization in specific areas, like analytics.
  5. Aaron: What book are you reading right now? How did you choose it?
    Peter: I’m re-reading The Spark by Kristine Barnett. It’s amazing what the human brain can do!
  6. For fun: what three things would you make sure you brought with you in a zombie apocalypse?
    My family! My Ferrari and an endless supply of crumpets with marmite.

We look forward to hearing more from you this week Peter. And in the meantime, marmite lovers UNITE!

As I mentioned in my kickoff post, we will host a series of blog interviews over the next two weeks with speakers from our upcoming PreCommerce Summit (March 10) and Movers & Shapers Summit (March 12). Today’s interview is with long time friend, author and Principal Analyst at Altimeter, Brian Solis. Brian will be doing a featured fireside chat at our Movers & Shapers event on Saturday. His session is will be right after lunch at approximately 1:15 PM CT.
a - BrianSolis

According to Brian’s LinkedIn profile, he is “globally recognized as one of the most prominent thought leaders, speakers, and published authors in new technology, digital marketing and culture shifts. His new book, X: The Experience When Business Meets Design, explores the importance of experiences and how to design them for customers, employees and human beings everywhere. Solis also designed the book to be an experience as a physical example of what’s possible when you take a step back to rethink products, services and models in a new economy (and world).” Some of the skills he’s been endorsed for by his peers are social media, digital strategy and marketing.

Without further ado, let’s jump right into our five questions:

    1. Aaron: How do you define innovation?
      Brian: I believe we live in a time where we need a balance of iteration and innovation to break free from “business as usual.”
      – Iteration is doing the same things better.
      – Innovation is doing new things that creates new value.
      – Disruption is doing new things that make the old things obsolete.
    2. Aaron: What are you or your organization doing to drive innovation?
      Brian: I start by observing technology’s impact on business and society. I then look at how behavior, expectations and values are evolving. I study problems and approaches to solving them. I also study how innovation plays out in terms of challenges, opportunities, successes, people, etc. I then share my perspective on everything in the form of research reports, books and speeches to inspire people to drive change.
    3. Aaron: Who is someone in your industry (or outside) that you admire? Why?
      Brian: I admire anyone in any organization stepping outside of their roles to take on the great task of change. It’s political. It can be demeaning. It’s frustrating. It makes you want to quit. But it is because of these people that any form of transformation can see the light of day.
    4. Aaron: Where do you see your industry being in 3 years? 5? 10?
      Brian: Change is now a constant. Disruption is now a choice. We either disrupt ourselves or the gift of disruption is given to us. Here are some of the things I’m thinking about over the next 10 years (also embedded below).
    5. Aaron: For fun: what three things would you make sure you brought with you in a zombie apocalypse?
    • Milla Jovovich aka Alice
    • Water
    • Perishables
    • Tools/supplies
    • Documentation
    • First aid supplies
    • Effective weapons
    • Delorean

Okay, that’s eight. But always a good choice to pick more rather than less. And smart vehicle choice with the Delorean. Assume that’s because it runs on nuclear power.

It is with great pride that I introduce today’s guest. I’ve known John Hallock for over 10 years…back when it felt like we were the only two people in the free world working in health IT marketing and communications. Today, John is vice president of corporate communications for Imprivata. For those of you who know John, you know that he has a natural gift for storytelling.  As we were both waiting to fly back on the red eye from last week’s HIMSS, I seized the opportunity to hit him up with questions. He didn’t disappoint. Read on…

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What does your company do?

Imprivata is one of the largest health IT security companies in the world. We serve 1,500 healthcare organizations across the globe. Our technology allows providers to securely access, communicate, and transact patient information securely. As we see it, digital health is at an inflection point: It is no longer about driving EHR adoption, but about how we connect those EHRs and allow information to follow the patient. As more and more healthcare moves online, we are a vital ingredient.

Describe the role that you and your team play in advancing the company mission.

I oversee all corporate communications, which includes media relations, government affairs, analyst relations and some internal communications along with HR of course. It’s an exciting time. We went public 18 months ago. There is a lot of growth and the organization is scaling quickly. Communications – both external and internal – is critical for keeping everyone on the same page, setting expectations and explaining how we innovate and launch new products.

What is your biggest success in the last year and why does this make you proud?

I joined the firm about a year ago. The company wanted to increase focus on business media and national media and I had a lot of experience doing that at athenahealth and CareCloud. Over my career, I’ve primarily worked with healthcare technology companies. Unless it’s Apple or some wildly successful online service, you need to very quickly figure out how you can tie the company’s products to the issues that matter most to clients and the public at large. With most companies, you’re lucky if you have one or two products that can do that. Early on at athenahealth we had to work hard just to get people to realize how big of an issue medical billing was. At Imprivata, I am lucky to have three.

For example and right out of the gate, I focused on electronic prescribing for controlled substances. Why? Because our solution is designed to address a high profile and important issue – addiction to prescription painkillers, which has become a nationwide epidemic. Imprivata sells the security technology that allows physicians to securely send electronic prescriptions for controlled substances to a pharmacy. Replacing paper prescriptions with electronic prescriptions is seen by experts as a big step in preventing doctor shopping and drug diversion – i.e., when people with addiction problems go from doctor to doctor collecting prescriptions for painkillers and other controlled substances. We saw immediate national press and the opportunity for real thought leadership that educated audiences on the issue and made the case for change.

We are about to take a similar, but more lighthearted approach to helping rid the medical profession of pagers. We also have a great deal to say about patient identification with our new Palm-Vein biometric patient ID platform. It plays directly into the interoperability discussion underway across the industry right now.

How many years have you been going to HIMSS and what’s changed the most?

This was my 12th. In terms of what’s changed the most, two things come to mind. First, security has become a leading topic. That was overdue and I’d like to think Imprivata has had something to do with getting people talking about it. And second, I would have to say…Allscripts’ colors. Every year I look forward to seeing what Allscripts’ new corporate colors are going to be as they pretty have much covered the spectrum at this point.

Outside of work, what are your favorite things to do?

I played golf in college and recently got back into it. One thing I can’t quite figure out is…based on the way most technology folks swing a club, it is a mystery as to why they would ever want to go near a golf course, much less sponsor the sport. Mind you, that’s not a commentary on my boss or CEO – they hit em straight every time (chuckle).

When I’m not on the golf course, I’m evaluating talent for the upcoming NFL draft. Belechick and Tom have me on retainer so this time of year I’m either breaking down film or I’ve got a stop watch and clipboard in hand. I’m only half joking – I do these things, but the Coach knows nothing about it. Also, I am proud to report that I no longer get into Brady/Manning debates with strangers at airport bars.

How do you empower and motivate your employees to do their best possible work?

Early in my career, I worked at a few big agencies — writing, doing media relations…the usual stuff. If you’re lucky, you get exposed to some bosses that show you how to be part of a team. It’s always great to be singled out as a top performer, but your impact will always be limited if you don’t learn how to collaborate with all the folks on your team. When I went to athenahealth, I tried to build and run a team that gave everyone the support they needed and allowed them to do their best work – and I had some success and failures on that front for sure. We are doing the same here at Imprivata. Once you become a manager, your job is to set others up to be successful. That can take some people a long time to learn — it certainly didn’t happen overnight for me. Of course, I still like picking up the damn phone and calling a reporter or producer and getting the big hit as well.

If a PR/Marketing God exists, what would you like to hear that God say when you arrive at the pearly gates? (my spin on James Lipton’s famous last question from Inside the Actor’s Studio)

If I can get there, and that’s very much up for debate, I would want to hear…”Listen, you did really well for a kid who never really learned to type. You told some stories that changed the healthcare system and impacted peoples’ lives. Kid from Worcester, so all things considered, ya done good.” Something like that. I am still working on my book “Travels with Johnny.” You are in it Rob, but don’t worry…I left out the shenanigans at HIMSS’08 (smile and chuckle).

As I mentioned in my kickoff post, we will host a series of blog interviews over the next two weeks with speakers from our upcoming PreCommerce Summit (March 10) and Movers & Shapers Summit (March 12). Today’s interview is with Javier Boix, Sr. Director, StoryLab, Abbvie

According to Javier’s LinkedIn profile, he is a “global communications executive with 15 years of experience in agency and corporate roles. Results-oriented, assertive, and able to navigate challenging and highly regulated environments that demand negotiating with and influencing a variety of stakeholders, juggling with multiple tasks and the ability to consolidate information from multiple sources.” Some of the skills he’s been endorsed for by his peers are corporate communications, internal communications and my favorite, strategic thinking.a - JavierBoix

Without further ado, let’s jump right into our five questions:

  1. Aaron: How do you define innovation?
    Javier: I don’t define innovation; innovation defines me. Kidding aside. How about “Combining two existing ideas to come up with something new and better.”?
  2. Aaron: What are you or your organization doing to drive innovation?
    Javier: It’s easy to get swallowed by the day to day; so keeping an eye on what’s going on outside of the company keeps me fresh.
  3. Aaron: Who is someone in your industry (or outside) that you admire? Why?
    Javier: Tomas Kellner. I don’t know him, but I recently found out about what he is doing with “GE Reports” and I love it.
  4. Aaron: Where do you see your industry being in 3 years? 5? 10?
    Javier: Hopefully in a place where our ability to drive innovation and make possibilities real is properly recognized.
  5. Aaron: What book are you reading right now? How did you choose it?
    Javier: I am not an avid reader, so this one is going to leave me in a bad place. I just finished “The Special One. The Secret World of Jose Mourinho.” As a good Spaniard, I am a huge soccer fan (Barcelona fan, for further detail). I read it because I wanted to understand what’s behind such character, and I did (but won’t disclose my opinion here, just in case…)
  6. BONUS QUESTION: What three things would you make sure you brought with you in a zombie apocalypse?
    Could it be five? If so, my wife and 4 children. If not, the 4 children are pretty young, so we can pair them up in groups of two so they only count as two (plus my wife, that makes three).

Thank you Javier. Well done. And extra credit for answering the bonus question. I would prioritize exactly the same way!

As some of you know, we host a series of events leading up to (and slightly overlapping) SXSW Interactive. Two of our most popular events are our PreCommerce Summit held on Thursday, March 10 and our new(ish) Movers & Shapers event on Saturday, March 12. Both feature a variety of brand leaders and thought partners — all focusing on how business is changing. Or put in simpler terms, innovation.

Over the next two weeks, I will feature a variety of those speakers here. First up is from Mark Young who is the CMO of Sysomos, one of this year’s premier sponsors and a close partner of W2O Group’s. I’ve asked each of our speakers the same five questions (plus a fun/bonus question). Of course some will adjust the questions to be more germane to their talks/business but ideally at least in the neighborhood of what I asked.

Here’s the list so far along with a few I know who will be contributing over the next couple of days:

  • Mark Young, CMO, Sysomos [interview here]
  • Javier Boix, Senior Director, StoryLab, AbbVie  [interview here]
  • Brian Solis, Author & Principal Analyst, Altimeter [interview here]
  • Lord Peter Chadlington, former CEO of Huntsworth PLC and founder/former Chairman of Shandwick Int, PLC [interview here]
  • Chris Heuer, CEO of Alynd and founder of Will Someone [interview here]
  • Patrick Moorhead, Founder of Moor Insights & Strategy [interview here]
  • Julie Borlaug, Associate Director, Borlaug Institute [interview here]
  • Kyle Flaherty, VP Solutions Marketing, Rapid7 [interview here]
  • Amy von Walter, VP, Best Buy
  • Alex Gruzen, CEO, WiTricity
  • Manny Kostas, SVP and Global Head of Platforms & Future Technology, HP

As I mentioned in my kickoff post, we will host a series of blog interviews over the next two weeks with speakers from our upcoming PreCommerce Summit (March 10) and Movers & Shapers Summit (March 12). Today’s interview starts with the CMO of Sysomos, Mark Young.

According to Mark’s LinkedIn profile, prior to joining Sysomos as their CMO he has worked in various roles such as EVP of Marketing solutions at Clear Channel Outdoor, Senior Director of Business Development at Intellectual Ventures and GM at Microsoft (who are those guys?). He’s also been endorsed for such topics as “strategic partnerships, management, business development, leadership, marketing and SaaS.” Not too shabby!a - MarkYoung

Without further ado, let’s jump right into our five questions:

  1. Aaron: How do you define innovation?
    Mark: I believe only true step functions can be innovation, the rest is evolution, which is great, but I like to save it for unique ideas.
  2. Aaron: What are you or your organization doing to drive innovation?
    Mark: Culturally we have built a company where all employees feel they have the ability to listen and create, not just the Data Scientists and Engineers. We had an internal hack-day a few weeks ago and we saw six ideas that were truly different uses of our data science and current technology.
  3. Aaron: Who is someone in your industry (or outside) that you admire? Why?
    Mark: Always my father… but inside the Industry there are so many. I was fortunate to work at Microsoft and got to see Bill Gates not only transform a business but turn that passion into greater good for the world. I feel like Sheryl Sandberg is doing that now. And as a father of a 22 year old woman who loves science, I really admire what Sheryl’s doing.
  4. Aaron: Where do you see your industry being in 3 years? 5? 10?
    Mark: We are on a journey with our clients to reduce the time to find insights and take action. We will move closer and closer to Autonomous solutions that empower marketers to be great story tellers and for consumers to have relevant and timely messages.
  5. Aaron: What book are you reading right now? How did you choose it?
    Mark: Think Like a Freak. Not a great story, my boss read it and recommended 😉

Thank you Mark. Love your answers. And trust me, you could do worse than taking advice from your boss and your spouse. But you knew that already.

Mitch Joel is considered to be one of the leading thinkers in digital marketing.  He’s also been thinking about social media, digital marketing and how our world is evolving for about as long as I have.

When Jeff Slater, leader of global marketing for Normacorc, recommended I participate in one of Mitch’s podcasts, it was an easy decision.  With approximately 500 podcasts under his belt, Mitch knows how to ask the right questions to talk about what’s next.

Here is our discussion via podcast.  This is #498, to be exact.  Enjoy, Bob

Kelly Jeffers
“I think the most valuable motivator is simply providing individuals with new opportunities and showing them what might be possible.”

Greetings fellow technophiles! Today, we are launching a new series of client interviews designed to showcase marketing/communications thought leaders who are making big waves in tech. For our first “Thought Leaders in Tech Marketing & Comms”, we had the pleasure of interviewing Kelly Jeffers, vice president of corporate communications for Surescripts. Kelly gave us some fantastic insight into the world of health information technology, and how she and her team work together to ensure every communications opportunity is maximized to its fullest potential.

Q: What does your company do?

A: Surescripts is a health information network that connects doctors, pharmacists, health plans and others, so they can communicate and share information with each other to deliver better quality and more efficient care to patients.  We’re an enabling technology – similar to the network that connects ATMs and banks. Because we move information around at such high speed, I’ve heard users of our network refer to us as the “Intel inside” the US healthcare system.”

Q: Describe the role that you and your team play in advancing the company mission.

A: At Surescripts, Marketing is solely responsible for the company’s brand. Our primary focus is on raising awareness and visibility for our brand among a broad set of constituents – doctors, pharmacists, technology partners, hospitals, health plans, etc.  Our business has evolved pretty drastically over the past few years, so we’ve been really focused on broadening people’s understanding of the role we play in connecting healthcare and the value we add to the healthcare system as a whole.

Q: What is your biggest success in the last year and why does this make you proud?

A: There isn’t a single campaign or initiative that I’m most proud of, but looking back, I’m pretty overwhelmed by the sheer volume of content we created. We have a small team with limited resources, but we really maximized every dollar and every opportunity to its fullest.  What I’m most proud of this year is the transition we’ve made as an organization, from an old-school, analog approach to marketing, to a “digital first” mindset that has come to life not just in the tools we use or the processes we follow, but ultimately in the work we delivered. The age of the paper brochure is officially over. And we now have some really impressive digital capabilities and content that I think is really forward-thinking.

Q: Where do the great ideas come from in your organization?

A: One of the things I love about my job is that I’m so plugged into the entire company and am always getting input and feedback from my colleagues, whether they’re in Customer Support, Legal, Product Innovation, or IT.  We get great ideas from everyone, and we make a point to take them all into consideration.  You just never know when a brief conversation by the water cooler is going to turn into your next great campaign.

Q: Outside of work, what are your favorite things to do?

A: For the past 15 years, I’ve traveled to Honduras to work with girls who have been abandoned, abused or otherwise neglected as a result of being born into abject poverty.  For one week, I’m disconnected from technology and focused on helping them become stronger, smarter, and more successful young women.  We do this by taking the time to play games, do crafts, go to the movies, and cook meals together.  It’s a good reminder of the value of being present in other people’s lives and finding your own small way to make a big difference.

Q: How do you empower and motivate your employees to do their best possible work?

A: Most of my career highlights have been the result of seeing other people succeed – especially the individuals and teams I’ve lead over the years. I think the most valuable motivator is simply providing individuals with new opportunities and showing them what might be possible. I’ve found that most team members will rise to the occasion if you just point them in the right direction. In doing so, they learn to look for new opportunities themselves, which is so refreshing and ultimately motivating to me as well.