CommonSense Blog

The Social Oncology Project 2016: Hashtag Communities

By Brian Reid | Jun 03, 2016

Download The Social Oncology Project 2016 here. Today, we’re releasing the fourth version of our annual report, The Social Oncology Project, a comprehensive review of conversations about oncology happening on publicly facing social media. Before I note some of the lessons we learned from this year’s report, I wanted to flag how the lessons we’ve […]

The Social Oncology Project 2015: Understanding the Ecosystem

By Brian Reid | May 29, 2015

Download The Social Oncology Project 2015 here.  Starting in 2013, my colleagues and I have published an annual report called The Social Oncology Project. The past two years, we have looked across all digital communications and surfaced literally millions of online conversations that mention cancer. The results were heady proof that there was substantial discussion […]

Why Three Physician ‘Superusers’ Have Prioritized Twitter

By Brian Reid | May 26, 2015

Later this week, the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting will kick off. Earlier in the month, research from W2O Group was published by ASCO, examining the use of social media by physicians. It’s an endeavor that will be extended later this week when we release our third Social Oncology Project report. Our research found, unsurprisingly, […]

Doctors and Social Oncology: The MDs most mentioned by their peers (breast cancer edition)

By Greg Matthews | Jun 17, 2013

One of the key findings of the Social Oncology Report was that cancer conversations have become increasingly fragmented, specific and sophisticated. The number of journal articles posted to PubMed has increased 349% since 1999 – and the number of cancer-related conversations has exploded in similar fashion. As those cancer-specific conversations continue to grow, we wanted to take […]

6 Things We Learned Through The Social Oncology Project at #ASCO13

By Mark Bennett | Jun 12, 2013

About two weeks ago we launched The Social Oncology Project.  As that project (and subsequent report) came to life, our focus was on uncovering insights by analyzing the numbers. While we found the data interesting, we wanted to go a step further and include expert opinions because we think the stories of how social media […]

Doctors 2.0 and You, Day 1 – the eBook!

By Greg Matthews | Jun 07, 2013

Yesterday saw the opening of the Doctors 2.0 and You conference in Paris, France. We were lucky enough to participate in the twitter conversation happening at the hashtag #Doctors20 thanks in part to the global interest in the Social Oncology Project, and our follow-up post on Medcrunch.net (What we learned from studying 16 million cancer […]

Doctors and Social Oncology: The MDs most mentioned by their peers (prostate cancer edition)

By Greg Matthews | Jun 06, 2013

One of the key findings of the Social Oncology Report was that cancer conversations have become increasingly fragmented, specific and sophisticated. The number of journal articles posted to PubMed has increased 349% since 1999 – and the number of cancer-related conversations has exploded in similar fashion. As those cancer-specific conversations continue to grow, we wanted to take […]

Doctors and Social Oncology: The MDs most mentioned by their peers (lung cancer edition)

By Greg Matthews | Jun 05, 2013

One of the key findings of the Social Oncology Report was that cancer conversations have become increasingly fragmented, specific and sophisticated. The number of journal articles posted to PubMed has increased 349% since 1999 – and the number of cancer-related conversations has exploded in similar fashion. As those cancer-specific conversations continue to grow, we wanted to take […]

Doctors and Social Oncology: The MDs most mentioned by their peers (skin cancer edition)

By Greg Matthews | Jun 04, 2013

One of the key findings of the Social Oncology Report was that cancer conversations have become increasingly fragmented, specific and sophisticated. The number of journal articles posted to PubMed has increased 349% since 1999 – and the number of cancer-related conversations has exploded in similar fashion. As those cancer-specific conversations continue to grow, we wanted to take […]