Privacy and data protection regulations impact the work of every advertising, marketing and PR communications professional around the globe, and the focus on privacy by consumers and regulators continues to increase. W2O’s team is tracking the most important news and changes that directly influence our industry, including the latest on legislation, new privacy technology, enforcement actions, analysis and thought leadership in privacy and data protection.

Here’s the latest news we’re paying attention to right now. This week’s news includes a French startup avoiding GDPR fines by quickly complying, second-party deals beginning to rise as a result of privacy legislation, data subject access request phishing, private blockchain usage guidance from CNIL, and IAB begins testing on their use of blockchain for consent management.

French Startup Teemo Appeases GDPR Regulators, Avoids A Fine 

One of the first companies to get the attention of French CNIL regulators under GDPR for processing data without consent made the necessary changes to comply and avoided fines. It took the company roughly two months to implement proper privacy and consent controls.

What this might mean for brands – Some observers suggest that while fines under GDPR can be severe, companies that take appropriate action when receiving a complaint will not necessarily suffer the full potential penalty. Many believe that EU regulators see GDPR as a way to encourage compliance, not necessarily a method of penalization. That said, no one knows what CNIL will do next, and if it will choose to make an example out of the next violation.

GDPR is Leading to More Second-Party Data Deals 

While GDPR has not yet had the far-reaching consequences to the ad industry that some feared, it is changing ad buying behaviors. With increases in the use of contextual targeting and consolidation into the large ecosystems, some publishers are reviving the use of second-party data partnerships. Similar to targeting known audiences on large ecosystems like Facebook, first party advertiser data is being used more and more within large multi-property publisher ecosystems to target both known and look-a-like audiences.

What this might mean for brands – Large publishers are creating new models that combine and unify audience data sets across their multiple owned publications, and that will give them both scale and a closed ecosystem with verified consent that brings them into competition with Google, Amazon and Facebook. Some organizations have shifted advertising budgets away from programmatic and towards the “big three” as they perceive them to be safer for compliance than third-party targeting, and now larger publishers are beginning to offer similar benefits.

Phishing and GDPR Data Subject Rights 

Ever since fraudulent emails claiming to be Airbnb tried to use GDPR update emails to steal user information, attention has been focused on preventing exploitation – particularly exploitation of data subject access requests – which could allow a phisher to impersonate a data subject. Spotify was the first company to make the news for releasing data subject information to a hacked account, and the recent Facebook hack is placing more focus on this potential use of GDPR to steal private data.

What this might mean for brands – Many believe that these types of privacy breaches will increase in the future. Two factor authentication, while not a legal requirement of GDPR, has been posed as a relatively simple solution instead of simply releasing information to logged-in accounts as Spotify did. Brands would be well advised to build this type of identity verification into their data subject access request work flows and privacy governance processes.

France Provides Guidance on Blockchain and GDPR 

The concept of blockchain inherently seems to conflict with GDPR “right to be forgotten” – essentially the right to request erasure of the data – which is not currently possible on public blockchain networks. Recently, France’s Commission Nationale de l’informatique et des Libertés (CNIL) became the first European data protection agency to offer guidance. CNIL determined that users of blockchain ledgers can be classified as data controllers under GDPR. They also stated that erasure can be possible on private blockchains by deleting private keys to which users access the blockchain. There is already debate as to whether this will work in practice, and whether destroying access keys amounts to erasure under GDPR. Regulating public blockchains like Bitcoin and Ethereum will pose a much greater challenge because they are already decentralized.

What this might mean for brands – Businesses who choose to use blockchain technologies need to be mindful that such usage could present difficulties in complying with GDPR, and particularly the “privacy by design” provisions. CNIL’s paper calls on organizations to consider whether it’s appropriate and suitable to use blockchain technology over an alternative for processing of personal data.

The opinions expressed in this post do not constitute or represent legal advice. No liability is accepted by the authors or W2O Group for any action taken or not taken based on the information or any associated communications.


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As a digital marketer responsible for planning, executing and optimizing campaigns you have a finite amount of “free” time. You are constantly trying to ensure that the objectives of your campaign are met, and you are delivering value to the business. Some days it probably feels like you have very little time to breathe, let alone think about the strategic direction of your organization.

So, when you see announcements or articles in the marketing trade press about news regarding digital analytics, marketing technology or advertising technology it’s likely impossible to keep up. Even more so because digital analytics and marketing technology are two of the fastest growing industries in marketing today. You probably would love to learn more about how these data and tools could be used to help further your business objectives, but there is simply no time.

That’s why our team of experts is releasing weekly recaps to keep you up to speed. Here’s what we’re watching this week.

  1. Brandwatch and Crimson Hexagon Merge to Focus on AI: Two leaders in the social intelligence space, Brandwatch and Crimson Hexagon, have merged both the existing Brandwatch name. There were no immediate announcements as to how either platform might change as a result of the merger. However, there were a couple hints that they will move to bolster AI investment and performance. It will be interesting to see how the roadmap fleshes out as these two influential vendors begin to integrate.
  2. Looker Adds a Bunch of Features for Better Access to 1st Party Data: Business intelligence tool, Looker, released a whole slew of new features at its annual conference last week. It seems the platform has listened to the needs of its customer’s and moved well beyond the ubiquitous ‘dashboard’ tool that so many marketers employee. Specifically, these new features allow marketers to better work with Google Analytics data, use cross-channel data to analyze audiences, and allow in-house developers to create custom applications. Having wide experience in creating performance views for our clients, we know that there is a never a one size fits all dashboard; everyone brand is unique, and Looker has allowed for each brand to have a more customized view.
  3. FBI Taking a Close Look at Ad Fraud with the help of ANA: This one isn’t nearly as scary as it sounds – but it may be helpful to many advertisers. The AdTech space grew quickly and organically leaving many alcoves for asymmetric information and thus somewhat shady practices. Recently, as advertisers have become more aware of fraudulent practice, some of this activity has been rooted out. After a 2016 ANA report, the FBI is now opening an investigation to examine the level of fraud. For advertisers, this means they’ll have a helping hand in tackling fraud. For agencies and AdTech companies, they’ll have an extra incentive to stay on the straight and narrow. Fraud will never completely be eradicated from AdTech, but the days of advertisers resigning a certain percentage of budget to fraud are hopefully in the past.

Those are the three pieces of news we are watching closely this week. Watch this space weekly as we’ll continue to keep you updated on digital analytics and marketing technology trends.


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I can’t think of a better year to have kicked-off our inaugural Marketing Sciences summit, given the data-driven marketing cross-roads we’re at. On the one hand, many speakers at the summit recognize that advances in ML and AI allow us to find patterns in huge volumes of data, far surpassing our capabilities just a few years ago (Jaime Punishill’s presentation on ML techniques like word2vec is a great example). On the other hand, many also recognized we have a lot less of the “right” data to analyze than we like to admit. While many companies have amassed huge volumes of marketing content and related targeting information (e.g., data lakes), this is rarely organized in a manner that lends itself to fast and meaningful analysis. Increased regulatory pressure and public mistrust has also led many advertising platforms, particularly Google and Facebook, to further restrict the data they share with us in the first place, leaving us to wonder what the data landscape will actually look like in the coming years.

In other words, it’s best of analytics times and it’s the worst of analytics times.

The speakers at the Marketing Science Summit addressed these difficult questions head-on. Three key ideas kept emerging, if we all followed, would make us both better data stewards and better marketers:

1. Be Intentional About Use-Cases for Data Collection and Analysis

Before building (or re-building) massive data warehouses, focus on the use-cases first. Currently, many companies are collecting as much marketing data they can and then develop hypotheses to test. This means a lot of time and resources have gone into creating massive, agile databases that aren’t close to being fully leveraged. The risk in this latter approach goes beyond inefficiency– you also risk not being able to make a clear connection between the information/privacy that a customer has entrusted you with and any value that the customer gets from sharing that information. Joerg Corsten and Jeet Uppal’s conversation on Data Lakes touched upon this topic nicely.

2. Focus on Data that will Actually Make a Difference

While the digital data explosion continues, many marketers feel that there is a dearth of valuable data, especially data that helps them understand their audiences or predict some sort of real-world behavior. A lot of the passive data that’s being produced by consumers is intriguing, but it’s most actionable when it’s being modeled against something of value. Sandra Matz and Greg Durkin spoke about this in some detail, specifically on how behavioral social media data can tell us a lot about how audiences wants to be communicated to, but that data has to be modeled against self-reported, psychographic surveys to make sense. David Hardtke also reflected on some of the missed opportunities he’s seen when clients don’t connect their sales-type data to the rich behavioral segments they see in media platforms such as Pandora. Ultimately, data needs a compass to make a difference at scale.

3. Always Ask, “Does the Data and Analytics Provide Value to the Customer too?”

This was one of the most consistent themes throughout the day, and it really should be the first question anyone asks before acquiring and using customer data. For one, it’s wasteful to do otherwise. Customers are quick to shut-out any content that’s not relevant to them. As an example, David Hardtke said it takes Pandora customers at most 5 seconds to turn off an ad they don’t like (even when in the car). Kevin Johnson’s panel with Mary Michael, Julissa Viana and Kieran Fagan also had several case studies demonstrating how analytics reveals what’s relevant to health care audiences including one that helped educate caregivers on detecting early signs of dementia.

I hope everyone left the summit feeling optimistic as I am about the future of marketing and how thoughtful use of customer data create value for everyone, from manufacturer to customer. I look forward to a great discussion on how the space has evolved at our 2nd Marketing Science Summit in 2019!


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Analytics pages.

We were thrilled to present last week on how to sharpen insights with data science at the ICCO 2018 Global Summit. It’s worth noting that we were almost equally thrilled that the venue for the event this year was Clontarf castle in Dublin. There was a distinctly ‘Game of Thrones’ aura as PR’s global leaders discussed AI and the recent PR-marketing-straddling Nike ad sitting on throne chairs next to tapestries and suits of armour.

Conversations were buzzing at the summit this year as it’s a pivotal time for our industry. Both at the summit and increasingly across the wider marketing and communications community, there is a growing perception that communicators have a crucial role in the c-suite as businesses strive to make the right choices at a time when they are being forced to take sides on social issues. Barri Rafferty, CEO at Ketchum, delivered the keynote on day 2 and said this will enable us, as PR agencies, to redefine our swim lane. This is good news as extending outside what is normally called ‘PR’ means that new opportunities for growth are opening up and we can increasingly position ourselves as integrated agencies. We will be able to ‘get our swagger back’ according to Alan VanderMolen, president of WE Communications.

To achieve this effectively, we as an industry will need to do three things to better serve our clients:

1. Master Insights and Analytics

At W2O, we have long been advocates of this imperative and have invested heavily in these capabilities. We know that if we truly understand our clients’ audiences we will enable them to make bold moves that may appear to ‘sacrifice all’ but are actually based on a firm foundation of evidence. This investment in our insights capability enables us to be more credible with our recommendations and we are glad to see this view spreading through the industry.

2. Position Ethics at the Heart of Strategy

We need to help our clients present a human face to the world. During the current techlash sparked by privacy issues, looming automation and fears over data proliferation, protection and ownership, we must show our clients how to be their best selves in the eyes of their customers. This point came up time and time again at the summit and it’s a key point for our healthcare clients who aim to transform healthcare for better outcomes for all.

3. Develop Technology-Enabled Experiences

Technologies are changing the way audiences experience brands -from VR to micro-segmenting for virtually 1:1 personalisation and what is happening in China with WeChat and influencer-fueled ecommerce. We need to understand the opportunities that these new technologies bring because they will enable us to take engagement to a new level.

To have any hope of delivering on these ambitions, PR firms will need to think carefully about the skillsets they are hiring. Gone are the days when a PR company was a largely homogenous collection of similarly skilled people. As Elise Mitchell President of ICCO says, “We need to be better innovators, technologists, data scientists, creative strategists, anthropologists and most importantly, better leaders.”

To compete today, diversity of both perspective and skillset is essential. At W2O we are advocates of this approach and have found that it has paid off in terms of sustained growth. We believe that in these times of accelerated change, diversity is the key to gaining advantage as we are able to maximise opportunities as they emerge.


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Analytics pages.

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Privacy and data protection regulations impact every marketing and PR communications professional around the globe. There is an immense variety of regulations and legislation within the USA, and within more and more countries around the world. W2O’s team is tracking  privacy news and changes that impact our industry.

Here’s the latest news we’re paying attention to right now:

Facebook disclosed a massive hack, and faces the threat of a 1.63 billion dollar fine in the EU

Facebook disclosed last week that attackers gained access tokens to 50 million accounts, which could give them full control of profiles and linked apps. This forced Facebook to reset access tokens of upwards of 90 million users. According to an EU privacy watchdog, The Journal, the breach could trigger the maximum GDPR fines. European regulators have not yet begun to hand out GDPR fines yet, and it is unclear whether they would apply the maximum penalty in this case, or any penalty at all.

What this might mean for brands – Everyone is watching EU regulators closely to understand how they will enforce the GDPR. Between Facebook and British Airways hacks, privacy professionals are waiting to see how the ICO will respond. While complaints are soaring across Europe, enforcement has yet to begin in earnest.

Uber settles data breach investigation for $148 million

According to a wide-ranging FTC investigation, in 2016 a hacker gained access to 57 million profiles of Uber riders and drivers, including 600,000 driver’s license numbers. Uber did not disclose that breach, and instead paid the hacker $100,000 through an internal “bug bounty” program to keep quiet. A year later, Uber announced the breach as a “failure” and fired two employees. Now Uber is settling for what seems to be about 2 percent of their 2017 revenue for failing to “safeguard user data and notify authorities when it was exposed”. They have also recently hired a chief privacy officer and chief trust and security officer.

What this might mean for brands – While the USA has had a variety of state and federal privacy laws for a very long time, this fine is noteworthy for its size. Even if the regulations are not as prescriptive as in the EU (yet – federal hearings have begun in response to CaCPA, which may or may not override California’s law), privacy regulations and enforcement actions are gaining more attention.

California signs country’s first IoT security law

In June, California passed what some observers feel is the country’s toughest data privacy law (the California Consumer Privacy Act) – and now they have added a new Internet of Things bill, SB327, making the state the first in the nation to have such a regulation.

What this might mean for brands – Some observers say this new law is too vague. The law reads that any maker of an Internet-connected device must ensure that there is “reasonable security features”, “designed to protect the device and any information contained therein from unauthorized access, destruction, use, modification, or disclosure.” While there are some specifics about unique preprogrammed passwords, and a requirement for a first-time user generated authentication, a lot of other points are described only as “reasonable security feature”.

CaCPA amendments begin

64 days after passing the California Consumer Privacy Act, the California legislature passed a technical corrections bill. This amendment primarily adds a six-month grace period, and excepts data that is already covered by other data privacy bills such as HIPPA. It also clarifies several other points including the private rights of action, and data elements in the definition of personal data.

What this might mean for brands – If your organization is not yet paying attention to and planning for CaCPA, now is the time. While there are more potential amendments, as well as potential preemption by a federal law, studies show that organizations who put privacy and transparency first see improved consumer trust and engagement.

The materials published on [our web properties] do not constitute legal advice and are for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed at or through our web properties are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of W2O Group. Please seek independent counsel for all legal needs.  


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As a digital marketer responsible for planning, executing and optimizing campaigns you have a finite amount of “free” time. You are constantly trying to ensure that the objectives of your campaign are met, and you are delivering value to the business. Some days it probably feels like you have very little time to breathe, let alone think about the strategic direction of your organization.

So, when you see announcements or articles in the marketing trade press about news regarding digital analytics, marketing technology or advertising technology it’s likely impossible to keep up. Even more so because digital analytics and marketing technology are two of the fastest growing industries in marketing today. You probably would love to learn more about how these data and tools could be used to help further your business objectives, but there is simply no time.

That’s why our team of experts is releasing weekly recaps to keep you up to speed. Here’s what we’re watching this week.

  1. Facebook Releases Their Own First Party Cookie: Among the fervor around protecting user’s data and privacy has been the quickly declining use of third party cookies – cookies that collect user’s data which are not connected to the host site’s domain. So, it’s logical that publishers are setting up their own first party cookies, just as Facebook announced last week. This follows an industry trend that I wrote about back in September when Amazon announced a tracking pixel and Facebook opened their tracking pixel to Facebook Groups. We expect to see more of these announcements and are already working with clients to explore the best way to manage them all.
  2. German Media Alliance Creating New Privacy Product: Just as the publishing giants like Facebook and Google are trying to maintain more data within their walled gardens, a group of 20 German media firms have combined to introduce a new product to wrestle that data back. The product would give a unified login for customers and allow them to easily control all their privacy settings. It’s a novel idea that, if executed well, could provide a much better user experience. However, this is also a direct attempt maintain control of user data given the disappearance of third party cookies.
  3. Sales Tech Ecosystem Evolving Similar to Marketing Tech: Inevitable to any conversation about Marketing Technology is the appearance of Scott Brinker’s infographic depicting all 6,829 Marketing Technology vendors. Similar, but smaller, is Nancy Nardin’s new infographic featuring 600 Sales Technology vendors. While the sales space may pale in comparison to the chaotic landscape of Marketing Tech, it’s still a lot to handle. At W2O we take care to make sure our clients are using the best possible vendors for their needs.
  4. Adobe and YouTube Both Announce New TV Features for Marketers: We’re always keeping a keen eye on the quickly changing TV space. Whether it’s newer connected TV or traditional linear TV, there has been a lot of innovation announced lately to help marketers better target and measure their TV advertisements. These are not always revolutionary features but incremental ones that are quickly making TV a more attractive and effective part of the marketing mix.

Those are the four pieces of news we are watching closely this week. Watch this space weekly as we’ll continue to keep you updated on digital analytics and marketing technology trends.


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Analytics pages.

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I started W2O with a mindset I learned at Genentech, a scientific company where our CEO Art Levinson taught us that if you follow the data you will get to the right outcome and it guides future direction and decision making.

With all the data out there today, there is no reason to guess anymore as to what strategy is needed to reach the right audience with the right messages at the right time.

We can apply what I have always referred to as Marketing and Communications Science to ensure how we deploy money and resources that produces the desired ROI and to make real-time adjustments before it’s too late and the money is gone.

My story was featured in one of our first books Pre-Commerce describing my e-Commerce journey that led me to the right surgeon for bariatric surgery that led to a 100-pound plus weight loss and arguably healthier lifestyle.

But it’s not all science and never is.  Science combined with expertise, know-how and instincts and some good old fashioned artistic creativity can lead to the most powerful engagement strategies.

Data just helps us verify our best instincts and could steer us in a direction we didn’t see at first.

What we hope coming together like this will produce is that scientific and creative exchange you can only get in a group setting that catalyzes and sparks connections you wouldn’t otherwise get or make on your own in your day to day slog.

We hope to see this expand and grow into something much more over time – maximizing the adoption and deployment of marketing science to enhance your businesses.

What will it take to see this more widely adopted in an integrated marketing model?  I would say it’s a commitment and conviction that if data drives financial and strategy decisions in the C-suite, it should do the same in the M&S -suite or marketing and sales suite.

Because we are so often the tail that wags the dog we might as well verify that with data and secure our rightful place at the center of a company’s business strategy and value creation.

Let’s get everyone out of their silos and let’s see the data unite and align everyone in a company in a common mission and vision.

YOU can be that catalyst and game-changer armed with the scientific data and proof required to convince boards and investors which way to pivot and when.

So let’s spend this day united in data and science to create iron-clad marketing and sales plans and execution that delivers value every day and can be measured to show impact and contribution in ways never thought possible before.

Let’s continue to innovate and advance the field together and, especially in healthcare, make a positive difference in people’s lives.

Thanks for spending the day with us. We are privileged to partner with you all.


Can’t make in person? We’ve got you covered. Head over to our Facebook page to catch the livestream. 

Stay tuned for recap posts from CMO Aaron Strout and MM&M.

Learn more about W2O, check out our About and Analytics pages.

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Rather than thinking about a traditional B2B marketing funnel and the message brands want to push to customers at different levels, what if we aligned where customers are in educating themselves about issues and the problems they face in learning about the market or their challenge? We at W2O have evaluated thousands of B2B audience interactions to develop a behavior-based model of the customer journey. We know audiences don’t follow a neat, linear path, so by examining actual behavior they demonstrate in social and digital, we learn more about how audiences interact with each other and with brands, what factors influence their decisions, and how to measure and talk to them in precise and accurate ways. It’s so much more accurate and predictive than demographics or titles could ever be.

For example, if a customer is very early in identifying a problem, they tend to exhibit behavior that shows they are struggling to understand what information is helpful and what isn’t. They might not even know any brand names yet, let alone which brands are the best or relevant for their needs. According to Google Research, 71% of all business decision makers start their research with a general category search that contains no brand names at all. Chances are, they aren’t even sure what to call their problem in formal parlance, so they are looking for help getting specific on terms and language.

As they learn more about their own situation, audiences behave in a more comfortable manner, parroting messages from brands and products, using the same language that brands push. Audience member’s searches, posts and questions in forums start to demonstrate that they see conflicting opinions about getting to the ‘right’ answer, and they start asking more questions. At this point, audiences start looking for other people with similar issues who have solved their problems. Rather than a category-level search on the web, they turn to forums with more specific questions, look to the media for reviews, and find peers they can trust for deeper opinions and examples. Brands can create advantage with easy-to-find cases and examples and through strategic influencer engagement at this solutions level.

And support after the sale is critical – implementation challenges and service teams are vitally important to developing a positive, long-lasting relationship with your audiences. The very same teams that are responsible for making the solution work within an organization are the same teams most likely to be the ones sought out for case studies and proof by the audiences in the earlier research phases. You need them to talk about the great experience they had with your team, and to help answer the questions for your next customers looking for solutions.


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Analytics pages.

Want to chat? Drop us a line.

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As a digital marketer responsible for planning, executing and optimizing campaigns you have a finite amount of “free” time. You are constantly trying to ensure that the objectives of your campaign are met, and you are delivering value to the business. Some days it probably feels like you have very little time to breathe, let alone think about the strategic direction of your organization.

So, when you see announcements or articles in the marketing trade press about news regarding digital analytics, marketing technology or advertising technology it’s likely impossible to keep up. Even more so because digital analytics and marketing technology are two of the fastest growing industries in marketing today. You probably would love to learn more about how these data and tools could be used to help further your business objectives, but there is simply no time.

That’s why our team of experts is releasing weekly recaps to keep you up to speed. Here’s what we’re watching this week.

  1. Adobe, Microsoft and SAP Create Open Data Initiative: Last week Adobe, Microsoft and SAP announced a data sharing initiative that will allow customer to have better interoperability between platforms. This announcement is significant because it shows three industry giants working together where they typically are at odds. It’s also significant because of who is left out of the agreement – namely, Salesforce and Oracle. Adobe, Microsoft and SAP have worked together in the past so it’s hard to say whether this move is a natural extension of their existing relationship, or if they are purposely trying to squeeze out Salesforce and Oracle. Regardless, this move indicates that the ‘big guys’ are taking the lead of smaller platforms and embracing integrations with complimentary players and competitors alike. This undoubtedly good for marketers because there is no single platform that can do everything. So, the easier platforms work together, the easier it is for marketers to achieve their goals.
  2. Salesforce Continues Push into B2C Marketing with Customer 360: A ‘single view of the customer’ has long been the holy grain for customer data management. Currently, Customer Data Platforms (CDPs) are the best marketing technology tools that exits to achieve this view. Last week, Salesforce released Customer 360 at Dreamforce which claims to provide the coveted single view of the customer. However, unlike CDPs that structure and maintain all of those data in one spot, Customer 360 calls the same data from multiple location upon demand. My personal experiences with CDPs have made me a believer in the existing structure. So, it will be interesting to see how Customer 360 stacks up against its CDP competitors.
  3. AT&T Unveils Xandr Advertising Platform: Since AT&T acquired AdTech platform AppNexus earlier this year, all eyes have been peeled to see how they would use the acquisition to bolster their advertising and analytics unit. Last week we received a little more information in the way of a brand reveal. AT&T’s new platform will be called Xandr and will introduce inventory for connected TV. Xandr has the potential to bring scale and ubiquity to connected TV in the same way programmatic display acts today. Perhaps more importantly, Xandr will provide anonymized cross-channel data for marketers to perform attribution; something that is getting more and more difficult to come by. Xandr seems to have a lot of promise so our eyes will remain peeled to see if the proposed functionality comes to fruition.

Those are the three pieces of news we are watching closely this week. Watch this space weekly as we’ll continue to keep you updated on digital analytics and marketing technology trends


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Analytics pages.

Want to chat? Drop us a line

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