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In the hyper-paced world of digital marketing and analytics, marketers are often hard pressed to keep up with the constantly changing news of the day. Between planning, executing and optimizing campaigns who has time to dig through the news to find relevant industry updates?

Seeing that this is an issue for most of our clients, we often cut through the noise and deliver updates on the most impactful trends in digital marketing and analytics. Now we’ve decided to open these insights up to everyone by publishing a weekly roundup of the most important news.

Here’s what our team of digital marketing and analytics experts are keeping track of this week.

  1. New Report Details the Effectiveness of Personalization: Personalization is loosely defined as customizing individual user experiences based on past behavior and predicted user preferences. It has been one of the most sought after, as well as the most elusive, areas of digital marketing. Personalization requires many things to be executed well – customer data, scalable infrastructure, a creative UI team and more. That is why many marketers never get past including a user’s first name in the corner of their website. This report from ARM Treasure Data and Forbes, however, explains that personalization is still worth striving for because it drives results; 54% of companies who use personalization exceed their revenue targets.

Main Takeaway: Personalization is now expected from users. So, while it remains difficult to execute, it’s more important than ever to invest in personalization. We’ve helped many clients go through the process of organizing data, understanding users, and delivering personalized experiences. We often see this as one of the most impactful efforts a marketing team can go through.

  1. Mailchimp Becomes Full-Service Marketing Platform: Mailchimp has long been known as the CRM and email platform of choice for small businesses. It was seen as a great platform for flower shops and local restaurants to get their word out through a simple and intuitive email interface. That was until two years ago when Mailchimp listened to its customers and started to add a broader array of marketing tools like Facebook ads, display ads, and more. This week’s announcement solidifies the scope of Mailchimp’s expanded functionality which will allow small business owners to spend less time switching between marketing tools.

Main Takeaway: The right marketing tool or tools completely depends on the size and needs of the business. For small businesses with limited resources, the ease of platforms like Mailchimp is imperative. However, for larger companies with complex marketing campaigns and a need for detailed analytics, a best-of-breed approach may be best. At W2O we pride ourselves on being platform agnostic, which means we can work with any existing platform or recommend and implement new platforms.

  1. OpenAP Aims to Bring TV Ad Buying into the 21st Century: Last month, WarnerMedia pulled out of OpenAP, the consortium that planned on building an ad network that would allow advertisers to buy audience-based media across major TV networks. The future of OpenAP, and TV ad buying generally, was left uncertain but the consortium has announced that they plan to move ahead without WarnerMedia.

Main Takeaway: Audience-based TV advertising hold so much promise because the TV clearly commands a captive audience but has been difficult to target thus far. However, the ecosystem of platforms and partners continues to be messy which is making it difficult for advertisers to place bets on any one horse. We recommend staying flexible while this nascent area of digital marketing sorts out. That is why we review platforms and partners at the beginning of every TV buy to make sure new opportunities do not pass our client’s by.

Those are the three pieces of news we are watching closely this week. Watch this space weekly as we’ll continue to keep you updated on digital marketing and analytics trends.


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Analytics pages.

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Last month I presented on the main stage of AUDIENCExSCIENCE, the Advertising Research Foundation (ARF) conference on audience growth and measurement. The topic was “Can Data Privacy Be Good for Brands”.

This is a topic I’ve tackled before on the W2O blog, and below is a recap of the presentation. If you’re interested in the videos:

Video 1 – Presentation

Video 2 – Q&A

Recap:

As always, the opinions expressed here do not constitute or represent legal advice. No liability is accepted by the authors, presenters or W2O Group for any action taken or not taken based on the information in this presentation or any associated communications. W2O Group recommends review and approval of any related activities, actions, or inactions by your legal representatives. Any and all information is subject to change.

Why is privacy important? When it comes to the internet and all things digital, privacy has not always been top of mind. Back in 1999  Scott McNealy, the CEO of Sun Microsystems famously said “You have zero privacy anyway. Get over it.” In 2009, the CEO of Google suggested that “if you’re doing something that you don’t want other people to know, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it”.

Recently though, things have begun to change, and there’s a new quote I’ll offer you to consider. “When you get home, email me the passwords to all of your email accounts, not just the nice, respectable work one, but all of them.”

This was said by Glenn Greenwald, who was one of the first reporters to see — and write about — the Edward Snowden files, with their revelations about the United States’ extensive surveillance of private citizens. He said it during a privacy ted talk in 2014, and I feel it captures the essence of why privacy is important. That feeling in your gut, that sense of intrusion is why privacy matters. Consider what you are willing to tell our spouse versus what you’d be willing to share with an advertiser.

Clearly, a storm is brewing now. So, what’s changed? Why are more people focusing on data privacy and protection?

The first substantial change was GDPR. The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation was adopted in a landslide vote in 2014, with 621 votes for and 10 against, and it became enforceable May 2018.

The second change, and the one that caught the attention of Americans, was Cambridge Analytica. On March 17, 2018 a whistleblower named Christopher Wylie told the New York Times about Cambridge Analytica using Facebook data on millions of Americans without their knowledge – in order to influence the outcome of the election.

Third is the never-ending news of data breaches. Equifax, Marriott, British Airways, Google Plus, Adobe, LinkedIn, the list is practically endless. The Verifications.io leak has now been identified as the largest in history.

Now marketers and communications professionals face the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), along with (currently) 11 other state level proposals to regulate data privacy – including the Texas Consumer Privacy Act, which is strikingly similar to the CCPA.

Both the US and global data privacy landscape is changing rapidly. Yet it is already obvious that the sky is not falling.

If we look to Europe as our canary in the coal mine, we can already see that privacy is good for business. The New York Times was afraid of violating GDPR legislation so they turned off their ad exchanges completely in Europe – yet their ad revenue grew. Non-Targeted ad impression CPMs are skyrocketing. Contextual targeting is making a big comeback. Even programmatic ad spending is continuing to grow.

Clearly, privacy legislation wasn’t the end for Europe. In fact, evidence is already showing that GDPR has had a positive impact. With that said, brands and marketers must act now. data and privacy ethics are not just a compliance problem, they are now an advantage and a competitive differentiator.

And the key is Trust.

Initial surveys are clearly showing that GDPR is increasing trust and transparency – and that’s driving more engaged customers. If customers trust you, they feel more at ease and become more loyal to your brand. Marketers who are meeting and exceeding privacy standards are actually getting ahead, not falling behind.

So, what should you do? I’ll offer you some concrete next steps.

First – don’t wait and see, and there are many reasons for this. Most immediately, the CCPA has a one year look back, so technically we’re already under its effect. The likelihood of congress agreeing on something and managing to override it is practically zero, so I suggest embracing data protection and privacy now as a key component of your programs and products.

Second – get organized. Many large organizations have no clue what data they have, how it’s being used, who’s collecting it or why… essentially there is often no data privacy governance at all. Brands need to get on top of their data immediately and know where their data is coming from, why they are collecting, how they are storing it, how their vendors are handling their data and so on.

Third – be transparent and cultivate trust. Tell your audiences why and how your collecting data, what you’re using it for, how it will benefit them and how you’ll protect it – and tell them in language they’ll understand. And also, very importantly – give them a clear and real choice. Customers who trust you will in fact give you more data, not less – and that data will be a LOT more accurate and actionable.

Then brands can use that trust to engage customers and develop an authentic relationship.

Fourth – Innovate.  Innovate intelligently, and with privacy as a foundation. As the industry continues to change and more legislation comes to bear, we need to continue creating new ideas and spins on older approaches. Embrace the use of AI-driven contextual advertising, premium publishers, better CRM programs, real 1-1 intent based website personalization, better use first party data and CDPs – the list goes on.

You can do all of this and many more things with a privacy-first approach.


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Analytics pages.

Want to chat? Drop us a line.

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Thanks to Cambridge Analytica, the Marriott mega-breach, the Equifax breach, British Airways, Facebook’s criminal investigation and many more newsworthy data privacy events, consumers are starting to wake up and understand the scale of digital data collection and how bad actors can use it to manipulate everything from purchasing decisions to elections. Politicians have responded with legislation like the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the Vermont data broker law, and 10 other (currently) proposed state-level data privacy laws, designed to reign in an industry that arguably abused an unwitting public.

The current paradigm shift is straight-forward: data is now owned by the people it reflects, not by martech vendors and advertising platforms, and it should not be sold, traded, or used in unexpected ways without informed consent. You would think that this is our demise….

Actually, it’s our golden ticket. Privacy, and more importantly data ethics, are now a key differentiators and offer an opportunity to deepen relationships with our audiences.

Social science and psychology research show that when people know they are being observed, they feel intruded and change their behavior. For example, information that we willing to tell our spouse is usually quite different than what we’d be willing to share with an advertiser. Which is why when the news broke that one of the most popular ovulation tracker apps, Flo, was sharing data with Facebook, it created an overwhelmingly negative reaction from users.

A few brands, most notably Apple, have begun to market their data protection and privacy practices as a prominent selling point. Studies are now beginning to show that strong data protection and ethics programs build trust with consumers and help brands gain advantage over competitors. Strong data controls enable agility and innovation, increase operational efficiency, mitigate losses from data breaches, and increase appeal to investors, surveys also found.

Now is the time for marketers to embrace data ethics and privacy.

Marketers that proactively go beyond compliance requirements and build privacy protection into the foundation will not only build trust with existing audiences but also capture the attention of those that are becoming disillusioned with competitors. Marketers and advertisers should question the data captured and ask what we should do, instead of what we can do. Here are a few points to consider.

First, invest in a privacy program and map understand your data flow.
Where is your data coming from? How is it being stored? Are your vendors using your data in ways you’re not aware of? Are you using platforms that don’t respect privacy ethics and legislation? How are you using your data – and if you’re not using it, why are you collecting it?

Having a clear line of sight into the data journey and map in addition to a robust marketing operations controls will help reduce risk and ensure customer privacy.

Second, embrace transparency. Whether it’s required for legal compliance or not. Ensuring your customers know why and how you’re collecting data, what you’ll use it for and how they’ll benefit from it – will help deepen brand loyalty and trust.

Third, do better work. Give people a good reason to engage by developing interesting and relevant content. Add value, entertain and enlighten them, and give them a reason to give you their data. A fair-value exchange will develop an authentic relationship between the consumer and a brand.

Finally, keep innovating! As the industry continues to change and more legislation comes to fruition, we need to continue creating new ideas and spins on older approaches. Embrace the use of AI-driven contextual advertising, premium publishers, better CRM programs, real 1-1 website personalization, better use first party data and CDPs – the list goes on. You can do all of that and more with a privacy-first approach.

The above has already worked for marketers in the EU where post-GDPR studies show that programmatic ad spend is growing by double digits as well as publisher’s digital revenue. So remember, privacy protection isn’t just a legal compliance burden, it’s an opportunity. Marketers who wait will be left behind whereas those who embrace privacy and transparency will cultivate trust and engagement, win market share against competitors, and build customer loyalty.


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Analytics pages.

Want to chat? Drop us a line.

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Powered by the W2O Corporate Relevance Index

How can healthcare companies move the needle to achieve gender parity and the enhanced corporate performance that comes with it? How do we create real actionable change?

Each year at W2O, we conduct a study that examines how companies are maintaining or falling in relevance. If your organization is not considered relevant, sales, profitability, recruitment, retention, innovation, leadership and valuation will be affected. Because of the gender parity movement, and our belief that parity ultimately impacts a company’s bottom line, we took our Relevance Index a step further in 2019 by adding gender and diversity as a key measure of corporate reputation. In this inaugural report we address a number of key questions including:

  • How relevant were Fortune 500 healthcare companies on the topic of diversity in 2018 vs. 2017?
  • Did the nature of the language being used by companies and stakeholders changing year-over-year?
  • Were stakeholders searching for information on Fortune 500 healthcare companies’ diversity policies and positions?
  • What were the most diversity-relevant companies doing and saying?
  • What are their employees saying in reviews and advice to management as relates to diversity and inclusion?

To learn more, download the whitepaper below.





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In the hyper-paced world of digital marketing and analytics, marketers are often hard pressed to keep up with the constantly changing news of the day. Between planning, executing and optimizing campaigns who has time to dig through the news to find relevant industry updates?

Seeing that this is an issue for most of our clients, we often cut through the noise and deliver updates on the most impactful trends in digital marketing and analytics. Now we’ve decided to open these insights up to everyone by publishing a weekly roundup of the most important news.

Here’s what our team of digital marketing and analytics experts are keeping track of this week.

  1. Digital Ad Spend Will Surpass Traditional in 2019: It was always a question of ‘when’ and not ‘if’ digital marketing spend would surpass tradition. Now, according to eMaketer’s latest forecast, 2019 will be the year that digital finally takes up a larger piece of the ad dollars pie. Probably the most interesting detail in the report is Amazon’s continued surge in gaining market share as advertisers continue to look for a way to diversify spend beyond Google and Facebook.
  2. LiveRamp Offers Identity Resolution Free to DSPs: This is a big one. LiveRamp is the leading data onboarder, helping brands match their target lists to the cookies and devices of the people they want to reach. Currently Demand Side Platforms (DSPs) license LiveRamp’s identity resolution capabilities. But reporting from AdWeek claims that LiveRamp will soon make this service free to all DSPs. This move would further increase the network effect for LiveRamp and draw more players into using the service for identity resolution across the digital marketing landscape.
  3. Connected TV is Taking Over Video Impressions: Extreme Reach released a report on video advertising and the conclusion was clear, Connect TV (CTV) is taking over! Over the course of 2018, CTV went from 15% of the video ad market to 44%. As the ability to target and tailor messages on CTV has increase, marketers have started to include it as part of their mix more frequently. Part of the reason is that the CTV space is less noisy relative to the digital environments of other video ad placements. We expect CTV to gain importance and eventually become a vital part of almost any marketing mix.
  4. UserTesting Tests Chatbots in Diagnosing Patients: At W2O, we often recommend chatbots to clients as a way to help deepen engagement with users as well as educate them. That’s why we were so curious about the results of a recent UserTesting study in which a chatbot was used to give patients a medical diagnosis. The results are a bit mixed but there are some fascinating findings in the study. For example, establishing brand credibility before making a diagnosis is key to getting past patient’s initial hesitations.

Those are the four pieces of news we are watching closely this week. Watch this space weekly as we’ll continue to keep you updated on digital marketing and analytics trends.

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W2O won one of my favorite awards in marketing and communications a couple of weeks ago: the Holmes In2 Sabre Award for Best Marketing Technology. What I love about this award is that it recognizes achievement in scaling great work, rather than recognizing a one-off campaign. It’s our second Best Marketing Technology win in as many years.

I’ve always suspected that campaign-based awards, which are so prominent in our industry, perpetuate the ubiquitous hero-culture at agencies. While this is a bit of an oversimplification, I’m sure all of you agency veterans know the story: A rock-star creative director, strategist, analytics pro, or similar, creates a one-of-a-kind project for a client, something so complicated, cool and amazing, it’s impossible to imagine anyone else doing it. The resulting campaign is unequaled. The individual(s) who created the campaign are indispensable.

I absolutely don’t mean to be a downer about rock-stars and amazing campaigns. But it is more important to recognize the creative individuals that go one step further and make their talents or ideas scalable, allowing far more people to execute like they do. Those are the people that make agencies great and, ultimately, allows us to deliver better services to our clients.

David Chang, the guy behind the Momofuku restaurant group and creator of, hands-down, the best business-related podcast in 2018, provides a good analogy in the restaurant industry:

“You want to make dishes that people can execute. My biggest pet peeve is when I see someone I’ve promoted to be a chef or sous chef and they put something on the menu and it’s delicious and it’s super [effing] cool, but only they can execute it. What’s the point? [The Chef’s] job is to make everyone as successful as possible. Why would you want to set up [your cooks] for failure by making a dish that they can’t do?”

It’s obviously a different business model. But the gist of what David’s saying is the foundation of our analytics practice at W2O: high quality and repeatable products that can be executed by as many people here as possible.

To that end, I’m very proud that we won the In2 Best Marketing Technology award again this year. We won for a product called Magic-8 Ball that uses organic search data to understand audience’s mental maps of various topics, the language they use to describe those topics, and how we can target them across a range of digital PESO activations.

The approach was conceived by W2O’s search lead, Alan Garcia several years ago. It was something, initially, he was doing manually. Then he wrote some Python code to capture the process and automate some of the more monotonous features of the analysis. With help from some of our software development team, it now has an appealing and easy-to-use UI and most (if not all) of our analysts use it regularly. It’s a great example of a creatively-minded analytics chef taking something that would otherwise be too complicated for anyone else to execute, and making it accessible to everyone. Alan’s also a big foodie, so I think he might have been inspired by David Chang’s podcast. Just a guess.

There’s obviously a place for recognizing amazing work and providing a platform for others to see these case studies and congratulate a job well done. But hero (or campaign) worship is a toxic recipe for growth, for both an agencies’ client base as well as the career development of its staff. I hope everyone joins me in pushing our industry to create awards that recognize agencies that deliver high quality work, time-and-time again, because they’ve developed the right methods, tech and processes to make everyone at the agency/company successful.


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Analytics pages.

Want to chat? Drop us a line.

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Privacy and data protection regulations impact the work of every advertising, marketing and PR communications professional around the globe, and the focus on privacy by consumers and regulators continues to increase. W2O’s team is tracking the most important news and changes that directly influence our industry, including the latest on legislation, new privacy technology, enforcement actions, analysis and thought leadership in privacy and data protection.

Here’s the latest news we’re paying attention to right now. This week’s updates include Washington State’s proposed Privacy Act, the California Governor’s proposal for a data dividend, and updates on the success of one of the first companies singled out for GDPR violations.

Washington State Proposes Privacy Act

Washington State is considering privacy legislation similar to Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”). SB 5376, now in committee review, grants Washington resident’s new rights regarding their personal data – including the right to access their data, withdraw consent and to have their data deleted. The bill refers to the GDPR specifically, noting that “Washington residents deserve to enjoy the same level of privacy safeguards.”

What this might mean for brandsIn the absence of federal legislation, and as the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) comes closer to going live, other states are now pushing forward with their own data privacy legislation. Brands should be preparing now for what could become a complex compliance landscape by embracing transparency and developing processes for handling consumer access and deletion request.

California Governor Suggests “Data Dividend”

Governor Gavin Newsom of California suggested in this first State of the State address that “California consumers should also be able to share in the wealth that is created from their data.” He also praised the CCPA saying “consumers have the right to know and control how their data is being used.” No proposal has been released yet.

What this might mean for brands While such a move would be uncharted territory, the continued conversation around data privacy should cause brands to focus on their own data use and protection. Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar recently launched her presidential campaign with a platform specifically calling for online privacy. Brands should expect continued and increasing focus on data privacy and protection.

Data Location Vendor Works with Regulators on Consent Model, and Achieves 70% Opt-In

French location intelligence company Teemo was one of the first organizations called out by regulators under GDPR for being non-compliant. At that point, Teemo worked with the French regulator CNIL to develop specific consent language and processes, which it is now enabling broadly across their platform. Mobile apps which include Teemo technology now clearly state that the app is free because it is supported by third party advertising and the use of the phone’s location. There are also links to the specific third parties data is shared with.

Teemo’s CEO Benoit Grouchko has recently said that “we now see opt-in rates that can go as high as 80 percent when we’re transparent.” He went on to say “not only has the market survived, but it has come out better because it’s much more sustainable now.”

What this might mean for brandsBy embracing transparency, Teemo has shown that privacy legislation has helped rather than hurt their business, and that fears of massive loss of access to data have not come to pass. As U.S. privacy legislation comes to the forefront, brands should now be using transparency and data protection as a key differentiator that drives deeper engagement.


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Analytics pages.

Want to chat? Drop us a line.

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As Marketers and Communicators Increasingly Rely on Analytics and Data for Social Behavior and Digital Experience there is still a major gap in Confidence 

Comprehending consumer movement across the purchase stream is critical for sales velocity and brand relevance.  In a digital environment, fueled by social interactions, such behaviors and actions are tractable providing a treasure trove of information and knowledge from which to develop strategy and plot programming.  In effect, a marketer’s dream.  However, the reality today is that such data and analysis is not leading to precision in engaging customers and building long-term relationships that create innovation and differentiation.

The culprit?  Insight.

Data without Insight is just information. Insight provides the contextual understanding and acute clarity of how data is connected and related to view a piece of information in a broader setting.  Insight, then, gives meaning and utility to data and analysis.  It ultimately can separate a brand from a competitive offering. But Insight is not a slam dunk.

Interestingly, marketers and communicators are incorporating data into their strategic decision-making without the critical Insight necessary to capture the permutations and combinations of information that generate true knowledge. So, what is it about Insight that eludes even the most sophisticated marketers and communicators?

In our experience, there are three components of Insight often ignored or discounted:

  1. Time  Pouring through data takes time especially to connect the dots among findings and observations and moving to discernment. Given the pace of business, taking the time to truly get it right is sometimes rationalized.  As such, findings and observations are often served up as Insight resulting in a suboptimal investment and missed opportunity in the marketplace.
  2. Expertise – Leaving Insight to just the analysts or data scientists is short-sighted and dangerous. Certainly, they need to be part of the discussion but also having the experts from specific clients, customers, market segments, channels, etc., leading the effort is very important to choosing the right data and gaining the inspiration inherent in Insight optimization.  It must be a team approach.
  3. Ensuring Business Focused Data at the Outset – Often, the lack of Insight is a byproduct of poor analytics at the beginning.  If you are not seeking information the drives the business the ability to gain a more holistic view and granular view of the organization’s market environment is forfeited.

Where we have seen Insight deliver unfair advantage these elements were all in place. It’s about developing the right capabilities and skills to discover answers by translating data into actionable Insight to solve business challenges or exploit unseen opportunities.  It’s really about seeing with a new lens and capitalizing on the troves of data out there that form a picture of an organization’s reality.

With the universe of data and technology available today just gathering information is nothing more than table stakes.  The winners are the brands and organizations who realize that Insight is the real value add in how they go to market, recruit, retain employees, and innovate. And while the world is constantly evolving, being smarter and clearer about stakeholders – needs, expectation, movements, behaviors – is where the game is always being played.  To remedy this problem, 2019 must become the year of Insight.

Who knows what you might find about yourself and customers that even they don’t realize?

Adam         


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About or Analytics page.         

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In the hyper-paced world of digital marketing and analytics, marketers are often hard pressed to keep up with the constantly changing news of the day. Between planning, executing and optimizing campaigns who has time to dig through the news to find relevant industry updates?

Seeing that this is an issue for most of our clients, we often cut through the noise and deliver updates on the most impactful trends in digital marketing and analytics. Now we’ve decided to open these insights up to everyone by publishing a weekly roundup of the most important news.

Here’s what our team of digital marketing and analytics experts are keeping track of this week.

  1. Facebook Opens Up Brand Safety Partnerships: Facebook has long been in beta with brand safety vendors DoubleVerify and OpenSlate to help brands ensure their content is being represented responsibly. Last week, Facebook opened the program to all brands. This brings Facebook up to parity with most other publishers. However, it may also create an extra bit of trust that Facebook desperately needs at this point with both advertisers and consumers alike.
  2. Qlik Acquires CrunchBot for Conversation Analytics UI: There always seems to be news coming out regarding chatbots and natural language processing (NLP), regardless of how enthusiastic consumers actually are about the platforms. Qlik’s new acquisition of CrunchBot continues the trend of interesting news with a questionable amount of utility for end users. The acquisition is meant to create a platform where users can make analytics queries through chat/voice UI like Slack or Alexa. The concept is certainly more convenient for many users than using code like SQL to retrieve data. However, given the current accuracy with most chatbots and voice assistants, data queries seem like a tall task.
  3. Confluent Raises $125mm to Further Event Streaming: Real-time event processing vendor, Confluent, raised a staggering $125mm to further build out its platform. Event processing consists of tracking user actions in real-time and making them available for other systems to act on. For example, a user’s action may trigger an alert or an update to a predictive model. This investment highlights the importance not only of data itself, but also how quickly that data becomes available.
  4. Salesforce Bolsters Datorama’s CDP Capabilities: There was some exciting news in the world of Customer Data Platforms (CDPs) last year when CRM giant, Salesforce, purchased Datorama. It seems that Datorama has taken that investment and quickly reinvested it into enhanced features. Last week it was announced that users would now have access to a slew of new features around analytics and activation. We see CDPs as a marketer’s best tool yet to attain the coveted ‘single view of the customer’ so its exciting the see the space generally, and Datorama specifically, continue to evolve.

Those are the four pieces of news we are watching closely this week. Watch this space weekly as we’ll continue to keep you updated on digital marketing and analytics trends.


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About or Analytics page.

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