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ASH 2018 (American Society of Hematology’s Annual Meeting& Exposition) has come and gone so it’s time for us to peer into MDigitalLife and see how health stakeholders engaged at the preeminent hematology conference.

One of the most unique elements of MDigitalLife is the collection of HCP digital presences matched back to their unique NPI numbers. This connection allows us to analyze HCPs based on a plethora of data points, including their Twitter activity. To really lean into this unique asset and provide the most value to our readers, we’ve decided to specifically look at how HCPs engaged in ASH18 and who they were most interested in this year.

There were over 37K tweets from 7,400+ unique twitter handles mentioning #ASH18 from 12/1 to 12/4. Of that conversation, we tracked 13,132 tweets from 1,064 verified HCPs categorized in MDigitalLife. To compare that to previous years, we looked at the number of verified HCPs posting at ASH since 2014 and plotted them in the graph below.

First the good news, #ASH18 total HCP conversation increased with a 3% bump over HCP conversation at #ASH17. However, we did see a slight decline in the number of unique HCPs posting at ASH this year, compared to last year. It was only a drop of 34 HCPs (-3%) but considering the change from 2016to 2017 was an increase of 339 HCPs (+44%) it is a bit concerning.

Looking at it another way, the smaller number of HCPs cranked out more posts than the year before with an average of 12.3 posts per author this year compared to 11.6 last year. HCPs were more active for ASH18, indicating a strong backchannel conversation and highly engaged audience.

When you look a little deeper you see that 43.6% of that HCP conversation came from just the top 20 most active HCPs, so we are clearly seeing a very engaged core group of HCPs who are driving nearly half of the conversation. Knowing who those core HCPs are and what they are saying is crucial to understanding the key messages coming out of ASH.

Beyond just volume of HCP conversation, we also took a look at which accounts HCPs are mentioning most to understand the most “popular”handles at ASH18.

Reviewing the list, you may notice quite a few familiar faces from last year’s #ASH17recap including our 3 most active HCPs at #ASH17, Dr. Thompson (@MTMDPhd), Dr. Majhail (@BldCancerDoc) & Dr. Mohty (@Mohty_EBMT). Other familiar faces include passionate patient advocates Myeloma Teacher (@MyelomaTeacher) & Yelak Biru(@NorthTxMSG). Side note, it’s always a good sign to see patient advocates engaging alongside HCPs during medical meetings to ensure the patients voice is heard.

Every account on the list above is absolutely crucial to the online ASH community, but we also wanted to look beyond popularity, to engagement in order to understand the accounts contributing the most shared content by HCPs during #ASH18.

Looking at this list of accounts receiving the most retweets by HCPs during #ASH18, we begin to identify some new faces contributing excellent content like Harvard Hematologist-Oncologist David Steensma (@DavidSteensma), Oxford HematologistGraham Collins (@Graham74gc), andUCSF Hematologist Nina Shah (@NinaShah33).Combined with longstanding HCP online influencers like Vincent Rajkumar (@VincentRK), Naveen Pemmaraju (@DoctorPemm), Miguel Perales (@DrMiguelPerales) and others, wesee a tremendous core of active HCPs contributing engaging content and leading a thriving online community centered around #ASH18. The HCP ASH community is clearly in good hands.

For more on the importance of social media at ASH, be sure to listen to my wonderful colleagues Eileen O’Brien & Brianna Pereira’s W2OGoPodcast on the topic published earlier this week.

And If you are interested in understanding more about the online ASH conversation and how you can best engage with key health stakeholders online, shoot me a note on Twitter/LinkedIn or fill out our contact us form and we will be in touch!

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Bringing primary care to all requires commitment to accessibility and the marrying of health and technology. As companies and organizations take ownership for accessibility it will lead to a better healthcare system for all.

This week’s guest, Robbie Cape, CEO and Co-Founder of 98point6, discusses this, the future of health, telemedicine, and AR. Plus, he dives into the music that drives his kids crazy and his love of knitting. Take a listen below.


Don’t miss an episode of What2Know, subscribe to our podcast on iTunesStitcher or Spotify!

If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Healthcare page.

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The American Society of Hematology is right now holding the 60th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition, its premier event in malignant and non-malignant hematology. I had the chance to catch up with two of my W2O Group colleagues ahead of the conference to talk about the impact social media is having at the meeting.

W2O analytics leader Briana Pereira and W2O social media leader Eileen O’Brien talked about everything from their predictions on social media volume at this year’s meeting to why some doctors find it important to post at conferences like ASH. Take a listen below.


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Healthcare page.

This week’s guest, Matthew Holt, wears many hats from Co-Chair of Health 2.0 to President of SMACK.Health. Why? To disrupt healthcare in order to strengthen it.


During our chat at Health 2.0, he shared how we all can disrupt the healthcare space, the future of data and pricing, and his personal take on the greatest invention from the last 50 years. Plus, he references a pretty epic Queen video by way of Green Day. Take a listen below.


Don’t miss an episode of What2Know, subscribe to our podcast on iTunesStitcher or Spotify!

If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Healthcare page.

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With just five months to go until the UK divorces itself from the European Union, the conversation has stepped up a notch to the point where it’s impossible to flick through a newspaper or turn on the TV without hearing conversation surrounding Brexit. After nearly a year and a half of planning, it is still to be decided what precisely is happening on Brexit Day, and what kind of deal, if any, Britain will be handed.

Like virtually all of the UK population, I have no idea what is to come once Britain leaves the EU, and in particular to our Life Sciences sector. So, I signed up to Fierce Biotech’s Executive Summit to hear the opinion of a panel of experts as to what might happen to the world of healthcare post-Brexit. Speakers consisted of leaders of key Life Science corporations in the UK, including the Bioindustry Association, the AMR Centre, and the Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult. They spoke about how they are planning for Brexit in terms of funding, staffing and any impact to longer term projects, as well as what opportunities may lay ahead once Britain has left the EU.

Brexit often has cynical connotations in the public eye. Most Londoners voted to remain, so when I arrived at the event, I expected this to be the general perspective of the audience and speakers. However, like the rest of the audience, the smiling optimism of the speakers surprised me. The first question that the panel fielded concerned the industry’s health in the current pre-Brexit limbo. They explained that the Life Sciences industry hadn’t experienced a quantifiable decline in funding or collaboration interest from their European partners since Britain’s decision to leave the EU. They even noted that 2018, so far, has seen a whopping record £1.5bn investment in Britain’s Biotech industry.

Overall, the speakers displayed huge confidence in the sector, along with some concerns worth bearing in mind, which broadly fell into the following topics.

No More Money Pot?

British researchers are concerned that funding from EU countries will be on the decline once Britain leaves the EU. The speakers gave their view that on the flip side, partly due to Brexit, private investment funding is strong, particularly from the US, with both academic and commercial sectors booming as a result. With groundbreaking drug results coming through, investors have been more willing to invest in earlier stages of research. Dr Peter Jackson, Executive Director for the AMR Centre, explained that some EU funded collaborative efforts are “fairly impenetrable”, so the UK often turns to the US as he believes that a “small amount of quick money is better than a large amount of slow money”.

More Agile and Innovative Approach to Drug Development

It was explored whether EU regulatory frameworks may promote or hinder the speed of innovation. A new EU Clinical Trials Regulation (Regulation 536/2014) will come into play next year in attempt to make clinical trial regulation more consistent across the EU, allowing sponsors to submit a single application when conducting trials in multiple countries. Once the UK leaves the EU, clinical trial sponsors in the UK will no longer automatically be eligible for the new legislation. Therefore, the UK will have an opportunity to adopt a more flexible approach regarding regulation. This could revolutionise clinical trials design, allowing the UK to innovate and focus on operating a more liberal, risk-based regulatory environment without over-regulation, giving patients access to treatments that are on the cutting-edge of medical developments.

Better Together

Researchers are concerned that leaving the EU could establish barriers to scientific partnerships and talent from EU nationals that have provided a massive boost for British research. To plan for a potential brain drain, Matthew Durdy, Chief Business Officer at CGTC said it made them explore avenues outside of Europe for future collaborations. The CGTC now has deals with China and Canada, and he explained that it has made them more open to the rest of the world, which has been “a real positive for us.”. Dr Chris Doherty, Managing Director of Alderley Park, built on this by making the point that, as a nation, we may not be fully utilising our most qualified employees. Britain is lucky enough to have a strong education system with a rich supply of PhDs, however, as with many jobs in the science sector, school leavers are being trained to do the same job as doctorates. Chris believes that with the advent of Brexit, we can look towards developing more specialist, focused positions for highly qualified candidates to utilise Britain’s top-qualified talent, and potentially spur more intra-UK collaborations. The development of consortia within regions across the UK would enable funds to be pumped into areas outside of the capital and other key UK cities.

In summary, my main takeaway from the event was that the biggest risk of Brexit is the uncertainty. It’s hard for companies to plan around Brexit, especially when they don’t know exactly what they need to plan for. Fortunately, the UK has a dominant position and a longstanding history of breakthrough contributions from its scientists. From Isaac Newton to Stephen Hawking, and Charles Darwin to Richard Dawkins, the pursuit of knowledge and innovation is embedded in Britain’s national identity. As we await the finalisation of some sort of agreement with the EU next March, people are working on it so that natural selection will favour the UK to adapt in order to survive. W2O will continue working with its clients to help them innovate, collaborate, and utilise potential regulation flexibilities. As for now, the Life Sciences sector will remain “business as usual”.


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Healthcare pages.

Want to chat? Drop us a line.

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Resolving America’s primary care shortage is complex but feasible. It will take discipline and an integrated approach. This week’s guest, Andrew Allison, Head of Next Generation Clinic Enterprise Strategy at Aetna, discusses how this can be done, telemedicine, goals for 2020, and his current athletic passion. Take a listen below.


Don’t miss an episode of What2Know, subscribe to our podcast on iTunesStitcher or Spotify!

If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Healthcare page.

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Using health IT to influence healthcare for the better is the future of the industry.  This week’s guest, Steve Wretling, Chief Technology and Innovation Officer of HIMSS, understands this implicitly.

We had the pleasure of chatting during Health 2.0, and during our time he unpacked the future of industry, including virtual hospitals and the union of data and health, plus his affinity for cooking and love of The Police. Take a listen below.


Don’t miss an episode of What2Know, subscribe to our podcast on iTunesStitcher or Spotify!

If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Healthcare page.

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Last week, I had the opportunity to attend the Connected Health Conference in Boston. With a focus on the intersection of healthcare and technology, I was excited to hear about innovations coming from both the large companies presenting keynotes and the emerging companies offering small-scale sessions or even posters. What stuck with me most post-conference, however, were the valuable human connections that were made. Not surprising, actually, since so much of the conference focused on balancing technology and the human elements of healthcare.

Having been focused in the digital health space here in Boston for more than a decade, I’ve been afforded the opportunity to meet, engage and learn from the luminaries in our space. People like the Rasu Shrestha from UPMC, Matthew Holt from SMACK.health, Health 2.0 and the Healthcare Blog, and Jonathon Dreyer from Nuance are leaders that I’ve followed closely as it relates to trends and insights, but they are also people who have helped me understand the power of human connections both in work and life. The Connected Health Conference further reinforced the notation of human connections having the potential to drive positive change and innovation for individuals and industry alike.

As I’ve spent some post-conference time reflecting on lessons learned, I thought a lot about the value these connections can have for emerging digital health start-ups and even larger established companies looking to expand their healthcare footprint. The business case for devoting time to relationship building and human connection is far reaching but, it’s important to consider the type of relationships that are most mission critical for you and your organization:

  • Fine-tuning and Funding – Emerging start-ups are well-served to look to bridge relationships with communications and marketing experts (like W2O Group!) that can help craft an on-point go-to-market strategy and positioning that will resonate with investors and key buyers. In addition, organizations like RockHealth, StartUp Health, Venrock and Oak HC/FT are go-to places for focused relationship building as emerging companies look to build their business model and fund their big ideas.
  • Innovation and Inspiration – Larger companies like Johnson & Johnson are increasingly looking to emerging start-ups for potential partnerships and even backing to broaden the reach of their own portfolios. For the more established “Goliath’s” of our industry, partnering with local incubators like the one here in Massachusetts run by Nick Dougherty from MassChallenge HealthTech is a great opportunity to identify and engage with inspiring start-ups that could help spur much-needed innovation or disruption. These incubators, which are established in a lot of cities at this point, serve as a catalyst for connecting both regional and national organizations of all sizes to solve longstanding healthcare problems.
  • Trends and Tipping Points – Media and influencers often have the inside scoop on emerging trends that are poised to drive healthcare evolution in short-order. Go-to resources like Chrissy Farr from CNBC, Nikhil Krishnan from CB Insights and Jess DeMassa from WTF Health each offer a unique perspective on what’s next in healthcare and are sources of truth for things ranging from breaking news via Twitter to deep-seeded research on topics like the future of blockchain in healthcare to executive interviews with the who’s who in healthcare.

The concept of Six Degrees of Separation is a powerful one and based on my experience at Connected Health, it holds true. In the digital health space, valuable connections are easily identifiable and pursuable given you take the time and come at people with a genius interest in moving advancements in healthcare and technology forward as a collective “long hallway” team. Time spent at conferences like Connected Health isn’t about the educational sessions or booths, it’s about the people you run into in the hallways and the connections you make over friendly conversations at lunch or over a dinner and glass of wine. These connections are the lifeblood of making innovation at the intersection of healthcare and technology a reality.


If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Healthcare pages.

Want to chat? Drop us a line.

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We all have a role to play in health equity and it’s time we all do our part in making it a reality. Regardless of your role in our healthcare system, there are action steps you can take.

This week’s guest, Stephen Lockhart, M.D. PhD, Chief Medical Officer of Sutter Health, shares what we can do to achieve health equity, the future of the industry, the role technology will play, and his love of Miles Davis. Take a listen below.


Don’t miss an episode of What2Know, subscribe to our podcast on iTunesStitcher or Spotify!

If you’re interested in learning about W2O, check out our About and Healthcare page.

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